Courtesy The Fayetteville Observer
  • Fort Bragg Murders

    In May 1985, Air Force Captain Gary Eastburn's wife Kathryn, and their two daughters, Kara, 5, and Erin, 3, were murdered in their home near Ft. Bragg, N.C. He said their loss has haunted him forever. "It's hard to explain," Eastburn told "20/20." "You just stop. Your world stops." <a href="http://abc.tv/rjZsHF">Watch the full story on "20/20" online here.</a>
    Courtesy The Fayetteville Observer
  • Fort Bragg Murders

    Gary Eastburn fell head over heels for Kathryn when they first met and they quickly got married. His job supervising air traffic control in the Air Force brought their young family to North Carolina's Pope Air Force base, near Ft. Bragg.
    Courtesy of Gary Eastburn
  • Fort Bragg Murders

    Neighbors describe Kathryn Eastburn as a devoted mother and loving wife. Here, she is pictured with daughters, Kara, Erin, and Jana, celebrating Jana's first birthday. In May 1985 -- a few days before Mother's Day -- Kathryn, Kara and Erin's bodies were found in their beds, their throats slashed.
    Courtesy of Gary Eastburn
  • Fort Bragg Murders

    The sole survivor was the Eastburn's youngest daughter, Jana, 21 months old. A neighbor found her in her crib, crying, soiled, hungry and thirsty. Left alone for almost three days, doctors say she had been only hours from death.<P>"I was so relieved to find that one was still alive," Gary Eastburn told "20/20." "Turned out she saved me."
    Courtesy Gary Eastburn
  • Fort Bragg Murders

    Police narrowed in on Timothy Hennis, a 27-year-old army sergeant and father. A neighbor said he saw a man -- later identified as Hennis -- leave the Eastburn home at about 3 a.m., soon after the murders are thought to have taken place. A woman told detectives she saw a white Chevy Chevette parked near the crime scene -- the same car that Hennis drove.
    Courtesy The Fayetteville Observer
  • Fort Bragg Murders

    Hennis had adopted the Eastburns' dog and police learned that he visited the Eastburns' home just a few days before the murder. Prosecutors said that during that visit, Hennis discovered Kathryn's husband, Gary, was away at an Air Force training program and returned to rape and murder her. In 1986, a jury found Hennis guilty on all counts. He was sentenced to death.
    Courtesy of Gary Eastburn
  • Fort Bragg Murders

    While in prison, Hennis received this letter: "Dear Mr. Hennis, I did the crime, I murdered the Eastburns. Sorry you're doin' the time. Thanks, Mr. X." Hennis maintained his innocence. After more than two years on death row, the State Supreme Court awarded him a new trial.
    Courtesy of Gary Eastburn
  • Fort Bragg Murders

    In 1989, Hennis' second trial began. The defense presented compelling new witnesses and reiterated that there was no physical evidence tying Hennis to the crime. Hennis also took the stand. On April 19, 1989, the jury found Hennis not guilty of the triple murder charges.
    Courtesy Raleigh News & Observer
  • Fort Bragg Murders

    Hennis was a free man. He returned to life with his wife, Angela, and their daughter, Kristina, and continued his career in the Army.
    Courtesy North Carolina State Archives
  • Fort Bragg Murders

    After the 1989 trial, Gary and Jana Eastburn tried to move on with their lives. For years, Jana Eastburn, pictured here, says she struggled with feelings of uncertainty and guilt about not remembering her mother and sisters.
    Courtesy of Gary Eastburn
  • PHOTOS: Ft. Bragg Murder Mystery Spans 25 Years

    In 2006, detectives with the Sheriff's Office of Cumberland County, N.C. sent evidence for forensic testing not available in the 1980s and found that a swab taken from Kathryn Eastburn's body contained Hennis' DNA. In 2006, the Army recalled Hennis to active duty and charged him with the killings. In a military trial, a jury found Hennis guilty of premeditated murder. He has since filed an appeal.
    US Army
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