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Betty Hailey
  • Saving Private Moss

    Private Moss always had a passion for football. A linebacker at West Hall High School in Oakwood, Ga., Moss was known as the speedster with "good feet" on his team. Watch the full story on "20/20" Friday at 10 p.m. ET.
    Betty Hailey
  • Saving Private Moss

    Moss was 19 years old when he met his wife, Lorena, in Georgia. After their first daughter was born, Channing quit college and joined the Army to support his new family.
    Channing & Lorena Moss
  • Saving Private Moss

    Moss on graduation day from Basic Combat Training with his daughter, Yuliana. He was sent to Afghanistan 10 months after she was born.
    Channing & Lorena Moss
  • Moss, second to right, before the ambush with some of his team members from 3rd Brigade, Alpha Company, 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry, 10th Mountain Division. He says for him, "it was very hard," to leave his family and that he kept a photo of his daughter in his helmet at all times when he was at war. He and Lorena had another baby on the way.
    Courtesy Channing & Lorena Moss
  • a

    33-year old Sergeant Wynn was on his second deployment in Afghanistan. He was in the front passenger seat of Moss' humvee and was also wounded. This picture was taken months before the ambush.
    Courtesy Eric Wynn
  • 23-year old Jared Angell was the medic who was sitting in the back of Moss' humvee. The men call him "Doc." He describes the attack and says that he "saw the glass go into a circle or shape because it got hit. I was definitely scared."
    Courtesy Jared Angell
  • Saving Private Moss

    The Medevac Crew based in Salerno, Afghanistan. Its members risked their own lives and the $50 million Blackhawk helicopter to save Moss. Christian Roberts, second to left, the crew chief, said they were "not gonna leave a U.S. soldier to die in the middle of Afghanistan."
    Jeremy Smith
  • Saving Private Moss

    An RPG or rocket-propelled grenade is a grenade warhead about the size of a baseball bat, mounted on a shaft filled with rocket propellant fired from a launcher. If the grenade on the end of the rocket exploded, right photo, everyone involved in Moss' ordeal would have died. But even without this warhead, the grenade is still lethal.
    Kevin Kirk
  • Saving Private Moss

    Oh and Kirk often operated together in the rustic operating room in Orgun-E, with limited medical resources. This is the hospital closest to the battlefield. Patients are stabilized here before they're flown to more advanced medical facilities.
    Kevin Kirk
  • Saving Private Moss

    Oh, standing in front of the scenic mountains of eastern Afghanistan. Oh had never seen an RPG before Moss was brought in for his wound, but he "knew that it was some kind of rocket or unexploded ordinance." Though they violated procedure by taking in Moss for surgery, Kirk says "it's very different when you see an American soldier come in who's in … .jeopardy and he has the same uniform as you do."
    Kevin Kirk
  • Saving Private Moss

    Kirk, far left, Sgt. First Class Dan Brown, middle, and Oh, far right, in front of the aid station where they operated on Moss.
    Kevin Kirk
  • Saving Private Moss

    It took three attempts to get a clear X-ray of what was inside Moss. Miraculously, it revealed that the grenade part of the RPG was not inside Moss but the detonator was. Brown was reassured by the fact that they "wouldn't be blown up completely," but they would all lose their hands. It was the worst thing he could have said to the surgeons, but they were all determined to stay and operate. "Whether it took fingers off or not, we had to get this thing out," said Oh.
    Kevin Kirk
  • Saving Private Moss

    Moss was transferred soon after the ambush to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C.
    Ana Gonzales
  • Saving Private Moss

    This photo was taken four months after the ambush. Moss is holding his second daughter, Ariana, who was born soon after he came home. He thought he was not going to see her birth. Moss says that he depended on his family to take care of him, especially Lorena, for about six months. He says, "My mothers, her mom, my wife, my children … all the women in my life have been my father figures, have been everything. I love them."
    Ana Gonzales
  • Saving Private Moss

    This past Memorial Day, Moss was awarded the Medal of Valor by the Hall County Sherriff's Department for his heroism in Afghanistan. Moss still has one final surgery remaining and every day is an uphill battle for him. "I know I got to fight. I know it'll get better in time."
    Jack Waldrip
  • Saving Private Moss

    Oh, who later married, says that no amount of training could have prepared him for the situation he encountered on March 16, 2006. "I think it's just ordinary people doing extraordinary things. And we just happened to have … a whole crew of extraordinary people helping us that day."
    John Oh
  • The surgeons Oh and Kirk paid a visit to Channing Moss and his family, shortly after both of them returned from Afghanistan. They were both very happy and proud to see him. "I didn't want him to feel like he owed me anything," says Oh. "I didn't want to intrude on his life. I know he had a long recovery, but in this case, we all needed some kind of closure."
    Courtesy Kevin Kirk
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