First Comes Marriage, Then Comes Love

The couple decided to keep dating and apparently liked what they learned about each other. Just 10 days after their initial meeting, and having fulfilled each other's checklists, they decided to seal the deal.

"Preeti just turned out to be the one that I was looking for, so perfectly," Paruthi said.

Although ten days seems astonishing, Gulati was confident in her choice.

"So long as you're sure about what you want in the person, you could be absolutely sure even in one day about the person who you want to spend your life with," she said.

A Tradition Worth Keeping

More than 500 family members and friends came together to celebrate their wedding. It was a lavish and colorful traditional Hindu wedding spread over three days. In the first ceremony, the bride and groom were introduced to their new relatives.

"There is a huge support network to say, 'You can get through this. And it might be tough, but this whole community is behind you,'" Seth said.

On the second day, the couple was formally engaged and exchanged wedding bands.

Festivities on the last day began with outdoor fireworks, as Paruthi arrived atop a white horse and was surrounded by portable chandeliers and street musicians. Gulati entered looking like an Indian princess in glittering jewels.

Fisher said this extravagant ritual was designed to jumpstart their relationship.

"During the marriage ceremony, which is extended and very exciting for everybody, excitement and novelty drive up dopamine in the brain and can push you over the threshold to falling in love. In India they say first we marry, then we fall in love," Fisher said.

And it seems to have worked. It has now been three months since the wedding and Gulati has moved to the U.S.

There are big adjustments though. She is just getting familiar with her new husband and a new country. She was able to transfer her job from India to Connecticut. But it is still hours away from Paruthi's job in Pennsylvania.

Although they're living apart for the moment, the couple agrees that they're in love.

They can be confident about the success of their arranged marriage -- just 5 to 7 percent end in divorce, compared with a 50 percent of American marriages made for love. Seth said there is a lesson in Gulati and Paruthi's arranged marriage for all cultures.

"Marriage is about a life partner, not a life-saver," she said. "I think we have to change how we think of marriage. Marriage is a long-term partnership. And the problem is, a lot of times, we drift into marriage like it's a summer fling and then we're surprised when it doesn't work out."

As for Gulati, she said there were no doubts entering her marriage.

"This is," she said, "for my lifetime."

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