Social Media and the Storm

How stories - and rumors - spread on Facebook and Twitter.
3:00 | 10/30/12

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Transcript for Social Media and the Storm
and it seems when everything else fails twitter and facebook are like indestructible and that has certainly been the case during hurricane sandy as dan harris tells us. Reporter: When big, bad things are happening, when it feels like the world is falling apart, social media can turn into what one writer today called a "virtual campfire." Real sign of the power. As a news reporter who was out covering sandy, I participated vigorously in this national conversation throughout the storm. From the beginning right through the end of the storm. It started on sunday when I was among the new yorkers stocking up. I tweeted, "why I love nyc, no panic, but long lines at fancy grocery stores." We don't panic. We're new yorkers. Reporter: And then when I was watching the mayor break into stilted spanish during his news conference. I wrote, "love listening to bloomberg speak spanish. It's like a male robot version of sofia vergara," which is when some of my followers directed me to a twitter account called miguel bloombito, which mocks the mayor's language skills. Reporter: It's also how I heard about this fan site dedicated to the mayor's sign language interpreter, who one writer called "a human emoticon." Humor, as you might have people were sharing pictures like this one, of a guy stocking up with food, phones, candles, a samurai sword and a disco ball. There were also lots of pictures of dogs in rain gear and even a picture of this. Oh, my gosh, look at this. Reporter: Twitter became my lifeline like this boat on the train tracks. Or this trampoline tangled in high power lines, and that crane that had its own prank twitter account which leads me to one of the big concerns, a lot of stuff you'll find here is fake like these sharks in the floodwaters or photoshopped storm clouds swirling around lady liberty. We're seeing twitter's immune system come in and activate. That the people were stepping up to fact check, to verify and celebrate the images that were were accurate. Reporter: It is much harder to fake video like this, however, and that was the other thing people were sharing big time on shoeshl media. Clips of trees falling on cars or being ripped rightut of the ground. Overall, sandy was a massive event for social media. Over 3 days, nearly 18 million tweets. As a way to participate. Outside my window. Reporter: At the end of the day, it's about meaningful connection from our leaders to the citizens. Like the governor of new jersey saying he's considering rescheduling halloween if it's not safe to trick or treat. We want you to be okay. Reporter: On facebook today the most shared term was, "we are okay." And the most-liked pictures were of a rainbow over america's largest city. On this day after an unprecedented disaster, resilient as ever, images that seem to say we are all going to be okay. And that is a beautiful image, indeed. Our thanks to dan harris. I hope he gets more twitter followers out that. When we come back we'll

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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