Teacher overhears teens looking up the definition of rape: Part 3

Savannah was sent to a guidance counselor, where she says she was asked about the party on Saturday night.
8:44 | 06/03/17

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Transcript for Teacher overhears teens looking up the definition of rape: Part 3
Reporter: Looking in the mirror never used to bother 16-year-old Savannah. She's young, pretty, confident. But the reflection she saw the morning of October 25th, 2015, was downright horrifying. My face was sunken in. I had bruise hickeys all down my neck. I just started crying, because I just felt so disgusted with myself. Reporter: Disgusted because Savannah's Saturday night was a dangerous one. Full of beer, liquor, and fireball shots. I felt like I was that drunk girl at the party, and I knew everyone was going to, like, just, you know, talk about it. Reporter: But she is about to learn from her friend, it wasn't just alcohol. She said, you know, you and Cameron had sex, but you were really messed up. And I said, you know, I don't remember that. Reporter: Savannah makes her friend promise not to mention it again, just pretend like it never happened. So at that point you were thinking I want this to go away? Yes. I was still kind of new, and he was who he was, so I knew that it'd be pointless to try and say something. Reporter: At that point, how did you define what he did? I just felt taken advantage of. Reporter: Did you feel like it was rape? Honestly, at the time, no, I did not. Reporter: Savannah goes to school Monday morning hoping her weekend secret is safe. But it's already too late. Rumors are swirling all over Spanish fort high. It started going around the school that Savannah was raped. So the word is out. People were talking about it. Reporter: Savannah tries to keep her head down, until she bumps into the man of that infamous hour, Cameron Harrison. He kind of dodged me, like wouldn't look at me, just kind of kept going his way. Reporter: Did you want to speak to him? Not really, no. I just felt like it was too, honestly, like, awkward and uncomfortable. Reporter: During design class, Savannah gets with Taylor and a couple of other friends to discuss what happened between her and Cameron. She kept saying, he just took advantage of the situation. We had both been drinking. Reporter: At that time, how would you have defined rape? Brutal, like holding, tied down, gun to your head, tight, just very violent. That's what I thought it was. Reporter: The girls tell Savannah she's wrong. And soon they start googling the definition of rape, right there in class. Unbeknownst to them, their teacher overhears them and Savannah is sent to the guidance counselor. They were like, you know, we've heard about this party Saturday night. You want to talk about it? And I kind of just broke down. Said I felt like I had been, you know, taken advantage of. Reporter: They summon her mother Emily to the school. I walk in and I seen my daughter in the corner, balled up in the fetal position with mascara running. Reporter: What did she tell you? That she had been raped, or sexually assaulted. And I got mad. That was my first reaction, I was just angry. Reporter: Emily and her husband Joe say they went through a range of emotions. First, disappointment in their daughter. But then outrage. Somebody can say, "She shouldn't have got so drunk." Yeah, I get that. No, she shouldn't have, okay? I don't care what she was wearing. I don't care how much she drank. I don't care if she was doing drugs. It doesn't matter. Nobody has a right to take something that's not theirs. That's the bottom line. To us, it was a black and white. Reporter: But for Savannah, it's a little more grey, she's waffling between damning and defending Cameron. Even texting a friend, "I feel so awful, Taylor. Cameron and everyone is going to hate me. I never wanted it to get to this point." It's all getting back to Cameron, whose friends, hearing the vicious rumors, tell him he needs to set the record straight. If not what happened that's not what needs to be said. Reporter: For his next play, Cameron, on the advice of a teacher, decides to go on offense. Somehow he found out that Savannah's parents thought they had sex and accused him of rape. And so he, being the gentleman that he was, wanted to apologize, make it right. Reporter: He may want to make it right, but he's about to make it worse. Believe it or not, Cameron goes to visit Savannah's father, the former marine. To tell him the sex he had with his daughter was consensual. That's the guy, he's outside, he's walking up right now. Joe, what did you say? My immediate reaction when he pulled up was violence. I am fixing to clear this porch off of this kid. I didn't say a word. I let him speak. He said, I know y'all are hurting, Savannah's hurting, but I'm hurting too. His body language was bizarre. 'Cause he was so calm. So ice cold. Joe and I were both shaking. Reporter: And he made a huge admission to you. He only did our daughter for five minutes. Five minutes. Only five minutes. Reporter: He said those words to you? Did it take everything in you to not want to lash out at him? I told him to get the Off my property. In a very christian-like way. Reporter: That very day, Emily and Joe call the authorities. And veteran detective Jason Vannoy is assigned. He wastes no time. Just because with kids, teenagers, allegiances can change, stories can change, I kind of want to talk to everybody I can as quick as I can. Reporter: After speaking to Savannah and her mother, he begins to interview students, about a dozen in all. They tell a consistent story about Savannah becoming what they called sloppy drunk. Then detective Vannoy inevitably discovers this, cell phone video taken at the party. The video showed the young people carrying the victim across the house and to the stairway. Reporter: What did you think when you saw that video? I took a long, hard look at it. Several times. And was mainly focusing on the condition of the victim. Her body was limp. At one point she had her arm draped over her face and it, she was just like a wet rag. Reporter: Just a few precious seconds, but for a seasoned investigator, oh, so revealing. It's realtime footage taken at the party, showing the condition of the victim. Reporter: How important is this video to your case? In my mind, this video took this case way beyond probable cause to make an arrest. Reporter: A week after the party, Cameron Harrison is charged with first degree rape, sparking a media frenzy. A charge of rape, a shocked and divided history. Reporter: When his friends see him in court the next day, now clad in a new uniform, they are beside themselves. It was definitely a slap of reality. My best friend walking down a hallway with a bunch of criminals in an Orange jumpsuit and shackles on, and cameras all in his face. That is so hard to see your friend like that. You go from a little small town kid playing football to a national media crisis. Cameron, what really happened at that party? Reporter: Cameron pleads not guilty. He's released on bond, but placed on house arrest. Suspended from the football team and forced to take his classes online. The next night is the toros' first playoff game. But they will have to do it without Cameron, the star running back. What was going through the team's mind? Us in the student section and the football team did everything we could to let Cameron know in spirit that he was there with us. That we wanted him there. So we put 4s everywhere. Reporter: Number 4, Cameron's Jersey. Plastered in the stands and on social media, a public outpouring of support. And not just from teammates. "Toros 4 ever" read this banner. Girls wrote 4s on their wrists and even a number 4 on the quarterback's towel. We wanted it to be known that we supported our friend. Reporter: For Savannah, the display instantly visible on social media. It feels like she's become the town pariah. How did all of this strike you? It really just bothered me.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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