A Town Divided Comes Together

ABC News held a Peace and Reconciliation Barbecue for Hubbard, Ohio.
4:57 | 08/19/14

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Transcript for A Town Divided Comes Together
The peaceful city that claims to be the official home of the nicest people? Or the horn blowing bedlam captured on Rick and Cindy krlich's surveillance cameras? This is stalking. Reporter: Has it become a living hell for you? Yes. Oh, absolutely. Definitely. Reporter: They say horn blowing bullies are ruining their lives. How do you get out of this situation? We really don't know. Reporter: Former judge Billie colombaro says she knows how it might be solved. Well, we're on our way to see Mr. Krlich and Cindy. Reporter: On a gray and rainy Friday, she came to Hubbard to try to mediate the noisy feud. The minivan diplomacy begins at the krliches'. Hello. Hi, there. Reporter: The judge says mediation has a better chance without cameras. Guys, you can leave. Out of here. Reporter: Three hours later, judge Billie emerges with a slice of coconut cake, but no deal. He's thinking about it, and that's a good first step. Reporter: Next stop, the clementes', the people Rick and Cindy say organized the horn blowing harassment in the first place. Hi. Reporter: Another marathon session, but at the end of the day -- My assessment, they're just not ready for mediation at this point. Reporter: It looks pretty hopeless, but the next day, clear skies and a new plan. "20/20" throwing a peace and reconciliation barbecue complete with banners, balloons, and burgers. We even hired a classical guitar quartet and an acappella group, hoping their harmonies will inspire. We all just arrived on the scene we got about an hour before everyone starts arriving. We've invited the entire town with full-page newspaper ads. It was a big story. A national news magazine trying to broker peace. Reporter: Think we're going to come to a happy medium over hamburgers and hot dogs today? Sure hope so. This is between two people and the whole city is involved. Reporter: We do want to welcome you to the Hubbard, Ohio, peace and reconciliation barbecue. The big question, the clementes and the krliches. If they don't show up, the peace and reconciliation barbeque is a bust. We heard conflicting reports. They were coming. They weren't coming. And then, surprise, suddenly there they are -- John and Marlene Clemente. And then we got word Rick and Cindy krlich were on their way. I think it's a little bit overwhelming for both of us. Reporter: And there they were, in the same place at the same time, for the first time in years, not counting courtrooms. Are you nervous? We don't know who is here. We'll see what happens. Reporter: For a moment, we thought we had a breakthrough. The krliches' representative vic Rubenstein confronts the Clemente's attorney, Jim wise, insisting they go ahead with mediation. Can we hear that from Mr. Clemente's mouth, that he's ready to mediate? My clients have always been willing to mediate. Well, then let's get it on. Reporter: But is he willing to compromise? That is up to him. I can't answer that. Reporter: The lawyers for both sides made brief statements, but the krliches and clementes themselves spent the peace and reconciliation barbecue avoiding each other. Here are John and Marlene. Rick and Cindy are way over there. But we did accomplish this. We got people talking, and better yet, listening. We had drivers driving past my house, beeping at this man's truck and standing in my drive enjoying my son's birthday party. Reporter: That story brought Kelsey back to the microphone. If somebody drives past your house and honks at somebody's car at your son's party, we can all feel for that. Reporter: And there was this moment, when Rick's mom got a little overwhelmed. It has been hell for seven years for my son and his wife, and they're good people. Reporter: A neighbor who came to complain ended up showing compassion. Well, let's hope it's all stopped. I hope it stops. This stops it. I don't like what happened. Reporter: So maybe this wasn't the end, but it sure felt like a new beginning.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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