Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    In the wake of the popular uprising that ousted Moammar Gadhafi from power after a 42-year reign in Libya, rebel forces overran countless government military installations. Now that Gadhafi gone, however, experts told ABC News they are concerned that the weapons stockpiles – including as many as 20,000 surface-to-air missiles – are out in the open and could fall into the hands of terrorists.
    Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    The Russian-made man-portable surface-to-air missiles are capable of locking onto the heat signature of aircraft, have an effective range of more than two miles and are capable of taking down a commercial airliner.
    Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    Human Rights Watch worker Peter Bouckaert first warned about the potential proliferation six months ago after a trip to Libya where he saw firsthand how unprotected the stockpiles were. "I myself could have removed several hundred if I wanted to," he said.
    Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    Sen. Barbara Boxer, D.-California, a member of the Senate's Commerce, Energy and Transportation Committee said that terrorists their hands on such weapons is "our worst nightmare."
    Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    Just as the rebels have commandeered hundreds of the missiles, former White House counter-terrorism advisor and ABC News consultant Richard Clarke said there was a "pretty high" probability that terror groups like al Qaeda could get their hands on the weapons.
    Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    The White House told ABC News a State Department expert is "on the ground in Libya" and working with the rebels to develop a "control and destruction program" for the unaccounted for missiles.
    Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    Many of the missiles, like those pictured here, were looted directly from villas belonging to the Gadhafi family.
    Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    A shipping document found by Human Rights Watch showed that the Russian government sold at least 482 of the missiles to the Gadhafi regime in 2004 alone.
    Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    The U.S. is facing a problem similar to what it confronted in Afghanistan after the Soviet invasion ended in the early 90s. Then, the CIA had supplied the Afghan mujahideen with 1,000 U.S.-made Stinger surface-to-air missiles and, after the Soviet retreat, spent millions trying to buy them back. Now, the U.S. government is working with its allies to round up the Russian munitions.
    Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    Bouckaert said rounding up the missiles is a daunting task. "This is one of the greatest stockpiles of these weapons that has ever gone on the loose," he said. "Once these missiles walk away from these facilities, they're very difficult to get back."
    Human Rights Watch
  • Missing Libyan Missiles

    Moammar Gadhafi has been on the run since the rebels overran the Libyan capital of Tripoli in late August.
    Norbert Schiller/Getty Images
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