ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>A Con Artist at Work: </strong>Brian Ross and the Investigative Team follow one Nigerian scam to a parking lot outside Washington, D.C. There an unassuming scammer thinks he's getting $12,000 for what he knows are nonexistent millions. Instead, he gets a dose of his own medicine -- scammed by ABC News.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Up Close and Personal: </strong>The e-mails and postal letters that rip off thousands of Americans, leaving them bankrupt and humiliated. U.S. Postal Inspector Steve Korinko told ABC News scammers use U.S. phone books and special computer programs to pull up e-mail addresses to find their victims.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Mastering Counterfeit: </strong>One of the latest Nigerian scams asks victims to help them cash checks or money orders that are so well counterfeited most banks have been fooled by them too, at least initially.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>The Bank Doesn't Know They're Fake... </strong>A U.S. postal inspector tells ABC News Nigerian scammers send a check for $8,500, asking the victim to send $3,500 back to Nigeria and keep the rest in return for their help. But by the time the bank figures out the checks are fake, the scammers are long gone, and the victim is out $3,500.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Making the Video: </strong>Ripping off gullible Americans has become a way of life for scammers in Nigeria, it's led to a hugely popular music video, "I Go Chop Your Dollar."
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Master vs. Mugu: </strong>The music video mocks the greedy white victim, known as the mugu, the big fool, being conned by people posing as prominent officials, promising him easy riches.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Becoming the Mugu: </strong>Brian Ross and the Investigative Team decided to let themselves become the mugus to follow the trail of the scammers. The team was told to contact a certain lawyer in Nigeria, "Chief," who told them precisely how to send him his lawyer's fee, a $4,500 fee, which they did using Monopoly money.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Disguise It Like a Birthday Present: </strong>Chief, the lawyer in Nigeria, then instructed Brian Ross and the Investigative Team to hollow out a book, place the cash in the middle and wrap it as a birthday present.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>The Middle Man: </strong>Chief then said it should be sent by DHL to Nigeria, which Brian Ross and the Investigative Team did, adding a few ABC News stickers to the outside.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Following the Trail of the Scammers: </strong>The package ends up in an office of Lagos, Nigeria -- an office about to get a big surprise when Brian Ross shows up with the cameras.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>A One-on-One Lesson: </strong>Brian Ross gets a lesson from Ibrahim Lamorde, the head of the Lagos office of Nigeria's newly created Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, the EFCC, who says the scammers have been protected at the very top of Nigerian government. One of the EFCC's first orders was to arrest its boss, the head of the Nigerian police, who was sent to prison for taking bribes from top 419 scammers.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Just Another Day at the Cafe: </strong>The scammers in Lagos, Nigeria, are known as the 419 men after the section of the Nigerian criminal code that makes it illegal to obtain money under false pretenses. Nigerian police say that at any given time, there are thousands of 419 men online at small, Internet cafes, trying to scam Americans.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Turning the Tables on the Scammers: </strong>The Lagos office of Nigeria's newly created Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, the EFCC, took along 20/20 cameras when they raided the Internet cafe, where the men online went running for the doors when the officers showed up.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>A Taste of Their Own Medicine: </strong>The 419 scammers in Lagos, Nigeria, were caught red-handed when their "cafe" was raided by Nigeria's new corruption unit -- their various scams were still running on their computers.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Doing Their Dirty Laundry: </strong> One Nigerian scam promises millions of dollars that have to be painted black to smuggle it out of Nigeria. As caught on hidden cameras in Amsterdam, victims are told there is a special, very expensive chemical that can clean the black money so it can be used. And the scammers put on an elaborate demonstration to show how it works. Powders are sprinkled; the money is washed; and presto, it's clean.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>And the Grand Prize Is... </strong>A suitcase filled with black construction paper is the end of the line for some bankrupt and humiliated victims of Nigerian e-mail scams.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Brian Ross in Action: </strong>Teaming up with a California heart surgeon, Brian Ross confronts the "black money" scammers, eventually leading to their breakdown and their admission of wrongdoing.
    ABC News
  • Nigerian Scam

    <strong>Admitting Is the Hardest Part: </strong>Caught red-handed in the "black money" scam, the con artist weeps in shame and finally admits what he had done. But his victim had no sympathy and asked the scammer to leave the room immediately.
    ABC News
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PHOTO: Left, Sabrina Allen, 4, is shown in this photo provided by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children; right, Sabrina Allen, 17, is seen in this undated handout photo.
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children|Courtesy of PI Phillip Klein
Kelly Ripa
Seth Poppel/Yearbook Library
PHOTO: Earths moon is pictured as observed in visible light, left, topography, center, and the GRAIL gravity gradients, right.
NASA/GSFC/JPL/Colorado School of Mines/MIT