Stress Test Score: Banks Need $75B More

Despite the government's belief that these tests will clear up the state of the nation's biggest banks, some critics have argued that stress tests won't make the effects of the crisis any clearer.

"It's causing a lot of confusion," Miller said. "I think it was poorly done."

Joseph Mason, the Moyse/LBA Chair of Banking at the Louisiana State University Ourso School of Business, echoed that criticism.

"Stress tests will reveal nothing of value, and the financial crisis uncertainty will continue to drag down economic growth," he said.

Gerald Seib, Washington bureau chief for the Wall Street Journal, contended that the stress tests are "a no-win situation".

"If the government says most or all of the banks are fine, then no one is going to believe them because it's going to look like it's a whitewash," Seib told ABC News on Sunday. "If they say, 'well, here's some serious problems,' then everybody gets panicked and they're wondering how far those problems go. I don't know how we go through the stress test thing without having one or the other adverse consequence."

Should You Pull Your Money Out?

Experts advise that, no matter how a bank fares on the stress tests, consumers should remember that most bank deposits -- specifically, those up to $250,000 -- are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and won't be threatened even if the bank holding the deposit is in trouble.

Some, however, insist on pulling their deposits from the big banks, not because they're worried about the safety of their cash, but because they're just fed up with banks that have received taxpayer bailouts.

That's what Houston resident Harris has done. She recently closed a bank account with JPMorgan Chase and a credit card account with Bank of America.

"I'm sick of the government keeping them afloat," Harris said. "It burns me up."

But Dave Kansas, the author of "The Wall Street Journal Guide to the End of Wall Street As We Know It," says consumers like Harris might want to think twice about pulling money from bailed-out banks.

"Taking a moral stance isn't always the best financial stance," he said.

In an effort to attract more business, some less-healthy banks may offer new incentives to bank customers, like higher interest rates on certificates of deposit. But those banks may also be raising fees and taking other consumer-unfriendly steps to also raise cash, Kansas said.

"It's a time when individuals need to be very vigilant, not because their cash deposits are at risk but because of the pressure on the banks," he said. "The opportunities for individuals are going to be varying so much between different banks, individuals need to keep a closer eye on that."

ABC News' Charlie Herman, Zunaira Zaki, Mary Bruce and Alice Gomstyn contributed to this report.

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