Did Depression or an Alleged Bully Boss Prompt Editor's Suicide?

Genoways said the two men basked in the small review's recent literary success, but that Morrissey had become withdrawn and "his mood darkened" in recent months, leading to strained relations with his boss.

Genoways wrote that Morrissey "felt less important to me professionally as our staff grew. I know that he came to feel trapped, paradoxically, by a job he considered too good to quit. As Kevin struggled through these issues, particularly in the last year, his work suffered and his demeanor, to my mind, was often unacceptable for the workplace. We feuded over this often, and the majority of the VQR staff sided with Kevin.

"That tension between my staff and me grew poisonous," he wrote.

"Kevin in particular had a history of disagreeing with his bosses, and now that I was the boss I should expect to be hated," Genoways wrote.

"I don't doubt that these conflicts fed Kevin's depression, but I cannot accept the final blame. ... I feel unspeakably saddened by Kevin's death, but I do not feel responsible," Genoways wrote.

Genoways' lawyer, Lloyd Snook, also defended his client, who he said was in contact with the human resources department regarding the work environment at the Virginia Quarterly Review.

"Any time there's a suicide, a lot of folks end up either looking in mirrors and saying to themselves, 'What could I have done differently?' or they end up looking for other people to blame," Snook told ABCNews.com. "There's a lot of that going around on both sides. It's obviously an intensely sad time."

Workplace bullying may be getting worse with the recession. In good times, abused workers simply walk out, said Gary Namie, a social psychologist and founder of the Washington-based Workplace Bullying Institute. But with high unemployment, many employees feel they must stay put.

The Issue of Workplace Bullying

"The story behind the story is the employer's failure to respond," Namie said. "They don't know what to do about it. We've come to realize that when the institution doesn't know what to do, by default it does nothing, and they worsen the problem."

Namie said University of Virginia officials contacted him about general bullying issues two years ago.

"They wanted a motivational speaker," he said, but the two sides were unable to agree on terms and Namie never spoke at the school. Wood could not confirm the school contacted Namie, but said a daylong university-wide workshop on workplace bullying was held in March 2009.

The university has launched an investigation into the allegations of bullying at the journal. In a statement, university spokeswoman Carolyn Wood declined to discuss "confidential personal matters" but added: "We can say unequivocally that before Mr. Morrissey's death, all Virginia Quarterly Review staff members had been working with human resources professionals to address issues within the VQR office."

"In the wake of Mr. Morrissey's death," the statement said, "the university continues to work with all members of the VQR staff to address and resolve these issues."

In Morrissey's case, co-workers said he appeared to become more despondent in recent months as his relationship with his boss and longtime close friend deteriorated with no solution in sight.

"I am convinced that the escalating events of the last two weeks of his life drove him to a point where he felt there was no relief available for him," the co-worker said.

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