Recession Reality: People With Good Jobs Need 2nd Jobs

Roy Krause, CEO of Spherion, a national recruitment and staffing company has also noticed an increase in the number of people with full-time jobs looking to do a little moonlighting.

"Traditionally, we would see this kind of thing seasonally, at Christmas but now we're seeing a lot more people looking for multiple jobs -- an uptick of as much as 15 percent," said Krause, who added that the numbers are up even more in California.

The workers most affected seem to be in the "light industrial areas," people who work in warehouses packing orders or call centers, he said.

Jon Osman of Pittsburgh, Pa., said thought he would spend the rest of his working life doing something he loved -- selling houses. But the market crashed just as the 45-year-old had two kids in college and two about to graduate high school.

Moonlighting 101: When to Get a Second Job

Although Osman and his wife could pay their bills every month, they were facing an onslaught of college tuition bills.

"We decided to be proactive rather than reactive," he said. "We didn't want to run up our credit cards."

When the father of four examined his options, he realized he needed cash flow -- quick. So Osman began to moonlight as a limo driver.

Killing One Bird With Two Stones

"Their first question was 'What do you want a job for?' I guess I didn't seem like their typical applicant, but I just said I could use the extra money," he said.

He has been driving for the Silver Fox Limo Company for over a year now and said it's working out pretty well.

"I have been working a lot, driving the limo, and the Silver Fox people have been terrific, but I am still working my real estate job," Osman said. "If I do weddings, I bring my laptop with me and I can get a lot of work done sitting outside the church."

He appreciates the steady paycheck that comes courtesy of his limo job, and he likes meeting "interesting people," but said he is looking forward to the day when he can walk away from the limo for good.

"I would prefer to sell real estate, to be honest," he said.

Stokely, on the other hand, still works at Wendy's every once in a while even though his budget crisis has eased somewhat. He said the whole episode has taught him an important lesson.

"I think there was this sense among some people that I'm a lawyer and it's not dignified or something that I would go work at Wendy's, but to me that's the way the American spirit is," he said. "When you need the money, you go work for it."

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