New Mexico Ex-FBI Employee Says Co-Workers Were 'Jealous' of Her, Sues Employer

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In April 2009, Plaintiff was informed about one complaint against her about her time and attendance and resulted in an investigation.

However, there were "no negative remarks whatsoever as to Ms. Bonilla's performance in May 2009," the suit states, and "from 2008 to 2009, her "critical elements" rating got better."

Her 2009 evaluation stated Bonilla "has developed good rapport with her supervisor, and consistently provides prompt, professional responses to questions and concerns."

During the time and attendance investigation, Bonilla said she was "unfairly required to document every minute of her day for over a year in order to avoid a 10-day suspension, despite the fact that she was never before required to do so by her supervisor." This "nearly impossible feat" led to Bonilla's suspension without pay for 10 days, resulting in a permanent record suspension.

Garcia said her client believes that the agency failed to consider evidence that Bonilla provided to it regarding the time and attendance complaint.

"Several of her work duties required her to be out of the office, and the office also had no badge in/out policy," Garcia said.

These events led Bonilla to file a complaint with FBI's Equal Employment Opportunity Affairs of employment discrimination on Dec. 7, 2009.

But instead of improving her work environment, Bonilla said she was retaliated against and employees filed several "anonymous" complaints with supervisors about her "appearance, time and attendance and work ethic."

"She was also discriminated against because she is a Hispanic female who received the position she had over Maria Grossetete, and because several coworkers were jealous of her appearance and Latin singing career," according to the suit, which added that "management" also treated her differently "for these reasons."

"The Agency knew that Ms. Bonilla was in fact being harassed and retaliated against," the suit states. "The damage was done as to Ms. Bonilla and the agency did nothing to rectify what happened."

In April 2010, an "anonymous" complaint was made "that [Bonilla's] attire was offensive."

Bonilla "kept management informed of the harassment," but the suit states "they did not do anything to address the matter and told her to come up with specific examples of harassment and provide a report indicating such."

She said her supervisors "retaliated against her by giving her unwarranted lower performance ratings," and she was "continuously told she was going to get a poor rating" by one supervisor, according to the lawsuit.

In 2010, "as a result of everything that has occurred," she was "denied the opportunity to perform her music at an Agency event."

Bonilla "has now relocated to another office in California because of harassment and has since received good ratings at her new location, even obtaining an award," the suit states.

But "the harassment caused [her] a great deal of unnecessary stress for years," the suit states. She "also started having high blood pressure, which is a direct result of the work stress."

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