Lawsuit: Muslim Scarf Not Part of Abercrombie & Fitch 'Look'

Dean was initially allowed to wear a cardigan on the sales floor, but was later sent to work in the back room because the sweater violated the company's strict dress code.

"I was treated very unfavorably comparison to their non-disabled workers," she told the U.K.'s Good Morning Television. "I definitely felt a difference."

While the court found that Dean did not suffer disability discrimination, it awarded her $15,000 for unlawful harassment and ruled that the company failed to comply with employment law.

In 2004, Abercrombie & Fitch spent $40 million to settle a lawsuit in which several thousand minority plaintiffs claimed that black, Asian and Hispanic workers were steered to the stockroom and the back of the store instead of the sales floor. After the lawsuit, Abercrombie hired 25 diversity recruiters and a vice president for diversity.

And in 2002, Abercrombie & Fitch pulled a t-shirt that said "Wong Brothers Laundry Service -- Two Wongs Can Make It White." An Asian-American student group at Stanford University organized a successful boycott.

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