Gail Springsteen
  • kodak ads slideshow

    Gail Springsteen submited this photo of her grandfather, John Hernet, in his blacksmith shop in Sobieski, Wis.
    Gail Springsteen
  • kodak ads slideshow

    A little boy wishes his legs could reach the pedals as he tries to drive a tractor.
    Brandi Boatman
  • kodak ads slideshow

    In Rapid City, S.D., in the 1950s, the people in this photo appear ready to take to the sky.
    Marte Hult
  • kodak ads slideshow

    Katie Keane submitted this photo of her grandparents Hal and Mecca, who have now been married for more than 50 years.
    Courtesy Katie Keane
  • kodak ads slideshow

    These children are very interested in Frances Benjamin Johnston's camera.
    Library of Congress
  • kodak ads slideshow

    This Kodak ad from 1907 first ran in an edition of Woman's Home Companion.
    Kodak/library.duke.edu
  • kodak ads slideshow

    This 1917 advertisement promoted the Kodak and Brownie cameras, two of the most popular models at the time. The ad ran in a variety of magazine publications.
    Kodak/library.duke.edu
  • kodak ads slideshow

    One of the most appealing aspects of the early Kodak cameras was the fact that you could take them everywhere. This 1920 ad from Ladies' Home Journal highlighted exactly that.
    Kodak/library.duke.edu
  • kodak ads slideshow

    A 1916 advertisement from Cosmopolitan magazine featured Kodak's Premo camera, a popular Christmas gift that year.
    Kodak/library.duke.edu
  • kodak ads slideshow

    This undated color drawing from Kodak's early days was featured in several of the era's popular magazines.
    Kodak/library.duke.edu
  • kodak ads slideshow

    This 1918 photograph from the magazine Companion for All the Family promoted the idea of using the Eastman Kodak Company products to stay in touch with those far from home.
    Kodak/library.duke.edu
  • kodak ads slideshow

    This color drawing advertisement from the early days of Kodak showed how easy the cameras were to use for every generation.
    Kodak/library.duke.edu
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus