U.S. Coast Guard
  • Spill Brings Heartache

    Tar balls from the Deepwater Horizon oil as they were collected East Beach on Galveston Island July 4, 2010. U.S. Coast Guard photo.
    U.S. Coast Guard
  • Spill Brings Heartache

    The U.S. Navy MZ-3A Airship is enroute to the Gulf Coast and expected to arrive after July 6 at Jack Edwards National Airport in Gulf Shores, Ala. The airship was requested by the U.S. Coast Guard to support Deepwater Horizon Response operations of the Unified Area Command. The airship will be used to detect oil, direct skimming vessels, and look for wildlife that may be threatened by oil. The airship began the flight to the Gulf Coast last month in Yuma, Ariz. The airship is commercial A-1-70 series blimp, manufactured by the American Blimp Corporation.. U.S. Navy file photo.
    Handout
  • Spill Brings Heartache

    Contractors use improvised mops made of bamboo poles and absorbent pads to clean up oil in the marsh grass in Terrebonne Bay, La., on Saturday, July 3, 2010. Oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill made landfall two days ago, and personnel from Branch Terrebonne Parish are responding with both tested methods and impromptu ingenuity to recover it. U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Derek W. Richburg.
    U.S. Coast Guard
  • Spill Brings Heartache

    Homemade sign in Grand Isle, La., protests the loss of fishing jobs because of the oil spill. The sign blames BP for the death of its fishing dream.
    Sarah Netter/ABC News
  • Spill Brings Heartache

    SpongeBob Squarepants and his friend Patrick star in a homemade protest sign in Grand Isle, La.
    Sarah Netter/ABC News
  • Pelicans Helpless as Oil Hits Gulf Shore

    Sonja Daniel is a Birmingham resident who travels to the beaches of Gulf Shores, Alabama every summer to enjoy the sun and water. Sonja told ABC News she was at the Gulf Shores public beach when the fumes from the oil washing ashore were "so horrible" she became sickened by them. Sonja, like many in this area, returned to the beach -- this time Sonja brought a gas mask with her -- her way of enjoying the Gulf shores without breathing in what she calls "toxic air" from BP.
    Courtery Sonja Daniel
  • BP Oil Spill Damages Environment

    This image, according to a source who provided it and asked not to be named, shows barges at the site in the Gulf of Mexico where the crisis began. These vessels are working on the "top kill" effort to stop the flow of oil that began when the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig suffered an explosion and fire on April 20, 2010, and later sank.
    (ABC News)
  • BP Oil Spill Damages Environment

    The drillship Discoverer Enterprise was used in efforts to control the spreading crude, setting parts of the oil slick on fire to prevent it from reaching shore. This picture is from May 23, 2010.
    Lt. Cmdr. Rob Wyman/U.S. Coast Guard
  • Dead Animals Start Showing Up After Oil Spill

    A turtle is shown swimming in the gulf, approximately 16 miles off the Louisiana coast, May 3, 2010. Dozens of turtles have shown up dead in the Gulf, many of which are currently undergoing necropsies at the Marine Mammal Institute in Mississippi to determine the cause. At least five of the dead turtles have shown no trace of oil.
    Greg Jennings and Sarah Gould/ABC
  • Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Threatens Wildlife

    In this image from NASA's Aqua satellite, the oil slick from the sunken Deepwater Horizon drilling platform in the gulf of Mexico spreads toward the coast of Louisiana. The earth-observing satellite shot this picture on April 25, 2010.
    NASA
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