Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    The "Made in America: Building a Nation" U.S. Postal Service stamp issuance, launched Aug. 8, honors the workers who helped build our country. Eleven of the 12 stamp images were by photographer Lewis Hine, a chronicler of early 20th century industry, such as this man on a hoisting ball on the Empire State Building, courtesy of George Eastman House, International Museum of Photography and Film.
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    A welder on the Empire State Building is shown. "This massive high-rise required an astounding amount of man power," the postal service's description states. "It took slightly more than a year to complete, and opened in 1931. Thousands of workers—many of whom were immigrants and Native Americans—helped build the iconic structure."
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    Riveters on the Empire State Building are shown in this photograph. "It is for the sake of emphasis, not exaggeration, that I select the more pictorial personalities when I do the industrial portrait," photographer Lewis Hine wrote in 1933, "for it is the only way that I can illustrate my thesis that the human spirit is the big thing after all."
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    A man guiding a beam on the Empire State Building is shown in this stamp.
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    A derrick man on the Empire State Building is shown in this stamp.
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    A textile worker is shown in this stamp based on a Lewis Hine photograph.
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    A railroad track walker is shown in this photo. "Since the middle of the 19th century, when the first transcontinental railroad was completed, railroads have carried countless tons of cargo across the nation," the postal service description states.
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    "The extraordinary nature of early 20th-century industry hasn't faded from the public consciousness," the postal service description states. "The photograph of a powerhouse mechanic on the pane is a staple of popular culture. It depicts the sort of worker Lewis Hine (1874–1940), the photographer who shot many of the images on these stamps, cared about the most."
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    This image of a coal miner is from Kansas State Historical Society and the only photo not taken by Hine in the stamp collection. "Coal miners in states such as Pennsylvania and West Virginia often braved dangerous conditions to do their jobs," the postal service states. "Coal, the fruit of their labor, was used to make coke for steel, which formed the foundation of our cities' majestic buildings."
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    A millinery apprentice is shown in this stamp.
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    A linotyper in a publishing house is shown in this stamp. "The world is moved along, not only by the mighty shoves of its heroes," social activist Helen Keller wrote in 1908, "but also by the aggregate of the tiny pushes of each honest worker."
    Courtesy US Postal Service
  • Made in America Stamps

    An airplane maker is shown in the postal service's "Made in America: Building a Nation" collection, for which Derry Noyes, who has designed and provided art direction for United States postage stamps and stamp products for more than 20 years, was the project's art director and designer.
    Courtesy US Postal Service
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