Octomom Trademarks Nickname for Line of Baby Clothes

octomom trademarks her name

Ever wanted to brand your baby's bottom with the name of the most notorious mother in America?

Now you can!

Nadya Suleman -- who miraculously delivered eight viable babies through in vitro fertilization in January and has spent the weeks since creeping out the country and looking for ways to make a buck off her newfound fame -- has applied to trademark "Octomom," the nickname many media outlets gave her.

According to the two applications her lawyers filed last week with U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Suleman plans to sells Octomom-brand dresses, pants, shirts, as well as cloth and disposable diapers.

As part of the application Suleman, 33, signed a consent form that declares "OCTOMOM is a nickname by which I am widely known" and gives permission "to use my nickname as Trademark or Servicemark."

According to the applications, a $550 fee was paid when the documents were filed.

The trademark would likely apply only to those goods named in the application, so the press can continue calling her Octomom without having to dish out royalties, said Kenneth Green, the patent lawyer who filed Suleman's application.

"Trademarks are intended to identify the source of goods and services," Green said.

"In some cases two very different goods can have the same name as long as it doesn't confuse the consumer or lead someone to think both products refer to the same person. The test is always: Would it confuse someone?"

Though initially hailed as a medical marvel following the birth of the octuplets Jan. 23, Suleman was quickly criticized when it was learned that the mother had already conceived six other children, was unemployed and lived with her parents.

Soon after the octuplets were delivered it was revealed that Suleman was then receiving $490 a month in food stamps and child disability payments to help feed and care for her other children.

Suleman has come under attack for trying to profit off her large brood and is reportedly in talks to star with her children in a reality television show.

"Nadya has been interested in, and hoping to find, something not so intrusive to the family and babies while, at the same time, [something to] sort of focus on trying to make a little income for herself," Suleman's lawyer Jeff Czech told Star Magazine Wednesday.

Czech didn't return calls to ABC News seeking comment.

The lawyer representing Angles in Waiting, a nonprofit group that briefly helpe Suleman with nursing and child care when the first babies were relased from hospital said she "treated her babies as props."

"Nadya now appears to be putting her money making scheme of a reality show before, in my opinion, the best interests of her children," said attorney Gloria Allred.

Suleman also regularly conducts exclusive interviews with Radar Online, a Web site owned by the National Enquirer, for which she is paid.

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