Treasury: 10 Banks Can Repay TARP Billions

"Through the stress tests, regulators have assured us of financial market stability going forward -- there is a defined capital hole and there is adequate unused TARP capital for this shortfall," said Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Texas.

"In addition, banks are again raising capital in the private markets, which can serve to reduce the capital shortfall identified by the stress tests," he said. "If banks are unable to raise capital, there is adequate unused TARP capital for this shortfall."

With the Treasury Department set to announce in the coming days which banks will be allowed to repay TARP money, around $50 billion -- twice the department's original estimate of $25 billion -- may soon come back into government coffers.

Economic Justification for TARP 'No Longer Exists,' Critic Says

"The economic justification for TARP's creation and taxpayer assistance to financial institutions no longer exists," Hensarling said.

"It's clear to me that the original goals for TARP -- primarily financial stability and taxpayer protection -- are no longer the aim of the program," he said. "It is increasingly being used instead to promote the economic, social, and political agendas of the administration."

On Tuesday the final report will be posted on the Congressional Oversight Panel's Web site.

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