Consumer Alert: Beware of Mandatory Arbitration

Some consumer topics are utterly unsexy yet undeniably important and one of those is mandatory arbitration.

These days many consumer contracts -- for moving, financial planning, credit cards, cell phones and almost everything else -- contain a sneaky little fine-print clause that says if the customer has a problem with the company, the matter will be handled in arbitration rather than in court. Consumer advocates have long said that the clauses deny consumers their right to a fair hearing.

Now, one of the biggest players in the world of consumer arbitration has agreed to get out of the business after allegations that it was too closely tied to industry and didn't give consumers a fair shake.

Click Here to Ask Elisabeth Your Consumer Questions About This Topic or Any Other Consumer Issue

Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson sued the National Arbitration Forum for consumer fraud, deceptive trade practices and false advertising, and then swiftly negotiated a deal for NAF to exit the arbitration field.

"The company said it was impartial but, behind the scenes, it worked alongside credit card companies to get them to put unfair arbitration clauses in the fine print of their contracts and to appoint the Forum as the arbitrator," Swanson said.

NAF denied the allegations but agreed to bow out of the business. That leaves only two other large arbitration firms, and Swanson has also asked one of them to get out of the business.

Companies that have mandatory arbitration clauses in their contracts are now scrambling to rewrite them and name a different arbitrator. Consumer advocates are gleeful and hope this chain of events kills mandatory arbitration for good -- something years of lobbying and legislative proposals failed to do.

Protect Yourself From Mandatory Arbitration

Sally Greenberg of the National Consumers League called mandatory arbitration "one of the biggest problems" for consumers and said NAF's exit from the business is a "big deal."

But mandatory arbitration is not dead yet and my personal prediction is that other companies will rush to fill the void, keeping the practice in play. So here are some things you can do to protect yourself:

Read contracts thoroughly to see if they contain a mandatory arbitration clause.

Opt out of mandatory arbitration if you can. There may be a time limit to opt out, so don't delay.

If you cannot opt out and cannot find an alternate company to do business with, write on the contract: "I object to this mandatory arbitration clause, but am signing this contract because I am told I have no choice." Initial the statement.

If you receive a notice from, say, a credit card company or insurance company notifying you of changes to your contract, resist the urge to toss it. Read it and start the process again.

If a company files an arbitration case against you, never ignore it. Respond promptly in writing and send your response certified mail.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: The fake baby a man was carrying as he and another woman tried to sneak into the mother and baby unit at Mercy Medical Center in Merced, Calif., hospital officials said.
Dignity Health Security/Mercy Medical Center Merced
Leopard Cub Chills in a Basket
Odd Anderson/AFP/Getty Images
In this image from video posted on Facebook, courtesy of the George W. Bush Presidential Center, former President George W. Bush participates in the ice bucket challenge with the help of his wife, Laura Bush, in Kennebunkport, Maine.
(Courtesy George W. Bush Presidential Center/AP)
PHOTO: Left, actor/comedian Robin Williams arrives at the premiere of Monty Pythons Spamalot in this March 31, 2007, file photo; right, actress Mila Kunis arrives at the Los Angeles premiere of Third Person at Pickford Center for Motion Study.
Ethan Miller/Getty Images| Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic