EPA Releases 2000 Gas Milage Data

While a handful of small cars are getting 40-plus miles per gallon, the vast majority of new vehicles coming into showrooms get about half that, the government’s latest automobile fuel economy statistics show.

For the second year, a hybrid gas- and electric-powered vehicle — the two-seater Honda Insight — topped the list of biggest fuel misers with 64 mpg combined city and highway driving among 2001-model vehicles. It was followed by another hybrid, the Toyota Prius, and three Volkswagen diesel cars.

The huge popularity of sport utility vehicles again drove down the overall numbers of the more than 800 cars, trucks and vans listed in the annual fuel economy statistics released today by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Average fuel economy for 358 models or variations of SUVs, vans and pickup trucks was just over 18 mpg, compared with 23.6 mpg for nearly 500 cars on the EPA list.

And the Guzzler is … King-size SUVs such as the Ford Expedition, Lincoln Navigator and Dodge Durango and their twin pickups accounted for 12 of the 36 vehicles on the list with the worst gas mileage, all with 12 mpg or less in city driving and 17 mpg or less on the highway.

The luxury sport import Ferrari 500 Maranello was the biggest guzzler (8 city and 13 highway) followed by the Lamborghini Diablo (10 city, 13 highway).

With the growing popularity — even with high fuel costs — of minivans and SUVs, the overall fuel economy for all vehicles continued a steady decline that has been under way since the late 1980s, when average fuel economy for all vehicles was nearly 26 mpg.

Breaking Down the Statistics In the latest statistics, mileage ranged widely even within various size classes, and in some cases even within like groups of cars made by the same manufacturer. Among compacts, for example, the Volkswagen Passat average 20 mpg, compared with the Volkswagen Jetta and Golf diesels’ 45 mpg average.

Among midsize cars, the Mazda 626 and Honda Accord reported the best combined city-highway mileage of 29 mpg, while the worst in that category were the luxury Rolls Royce Silver Seraph and Bentley Arnage, both at 13 mpg. Most cars in the category came in the low- to mid-20s mpg.

“Choosing the most fuel-efficient vehicles in a class can save the owner at least $1,500 in fuel costs,” said EPA Administrator Carol Browner, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions which contribute to global warming.

But automakers and groups such as the Coalition for Vehicle Choice, which lobbies against government fuel-economy rules, have long argued that consumers want larger vehicles and not small minicompacts and compacts that consume less gasoline.

Hybrids Not a Current Factor The electric-gas hybrids are new and not much of a factor in the current market, although automakers say they are likely to be the next technology that will spur significant breakthroughs in fuel economy.

The Japanese-made Insight, which Honda introduced earlier this year and was on last year’s list, gets 61 mpg in city driving and 68 mpg on the open highway. The Toyota Prius, which is a compact sedan with the same technology, gets a combined mileage of 48 mpg.

The hybrids run on conventional gasoline with an assist under certain driving conditions using power from an electric motor and self-charging generator and battery pack.

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