8th Grader Petitions Seventeen Magazine to Feature Un-Airbrushed Photos

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But the quest for perfection begins way before the first click of the camera. This summer, "Nightline" profiled a model boot camp run out of the home of model scouts Mary and Jeff Clarke. There, young girls would be trained to walk and pose, as well as coached on keeping slim and fit. One aspiring model, 15-year-old Malia Greiner, who went through the boot camp knows every inch on her waist counts.

"I have seen friends of mine who were models really go to extremes and in some cases get very sick," she said. "One model who I've worked with -- who's been very, very successful -- her agency told her to get full body liposuction when she was still in her teens, and she did."

Lynn Grefe said she is pushing for some controversial legislation that would require warning labels to be put on all images that have been airbrushed, similar, she said, to the tobacco warnings on cigarette packages.

"We're not saying this image is going to kill you, even though eating disorders have the highest death rate of any mental illness," she said. "We want to educate quickly, which means that if a child can read, then the child can see that this is not a real photograph."

In the meantime, Julia Bluhm's protest earned her a meeting with Seventeen magazine's editor-in-chief on Wednesday.

In a statement to "Nightline," a spokesperson for Seventeen said, "We're proud of Julia for being so passionate about an issue -- it's exactly the kind of attitude we encourage in our readers -- so we invited her to our office to meet with editor-in-chief Ann Shoket this morning. They had a great discussion, and we believe that Julia left understanding that Seventeen celebrates girls for being their authentic selves, and that's how we present them. We feature real girls in our pages and there is no other magazine that highlights such a diversity of size, shape, skin tone and ethnicity."

And Bluhm plans on continuing her mission.

"We hope it will be like a baby step to grow into something bigger like maybe it will influence other magazines to do the same thing [on] other pages and maybe even a cover," she said. "That would be really cool."

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