Oil Keeps Spilling but Stars Are Slow to Come

It all added up. As of last month, according to Indiana University's Center on Philanthropy, donations to help Haiti amassed $1.3 billion, while dollars for Hurricane Katrina amounted to $5.3 billion.

Beyond the money, the grand displays stars made after Katrina and Haiti garnered attention. For the former, actor John Travolta revved up his private plane and jetted down to Baton Rouge, food supplies and tetanus vaccines in tow. Talk-show host Oprah Winfrey cut short her summer vacation to visit New Orleans and "personally assess how I could be best of service." At the NBC telethon to raise money for Katrina victims, rapper-producer Kanye West proclaimed that President Bush didn't care about black people.

The May 16 Gulf Aid concert, featuring Lenny Kravitz, raised more than $300,000 for the Gulf Relief Foundation.

Haiti also inspired a star-studded telethon, co-hosted by actor George Clooney and featuring some of music's biggest names, including Jay-Z, Bono, Alicia Keys and Justin Timberlake. Rapper Wyclef Jean made it the subject of one of the most ambitious text message and Twitter campaigns to date.

Haiti and Katrina got Pitt and Jolie, Clooney and West. The oil spill gets John Tesh and Sophie B. Hawkins.

Tesh, the Grammy award winning singer, just launched the Adopt a Fisherman project to support fishing families in Venice, La. Hawkins, who crooned the 1992 pop hit "Damn, I Wish I Was Your Lover," is donating all proceeds of her new single, "The Land, the Sea, the Sky," to the charity Water Keepers' Alliance, along with proceeds from three upcoming concerts.

"This could be the worst catastrophe of our lives and no one is acting fast enough," Hawkins said in an interview with ABCNews.com. "It is shocking me. I was at an event last night in Hollywood simply to promote my single and the fact that all proceeds from it are going to the oil spill and people acted like they had never heard of this crisis."

Loss of Life Not the Same

To be fair, the loss of human life from the oil spill doesn't compare to the hundreds that died after Hurricane Katrina or the hundreds of thousands that died in the Haiti Earthquake. Norton speculated that may be why Hollywood's hesitant to latch on.

"It's very easy to say, 'My money can help take medical supplies to these people who are suffering,' he said. "But I think people look at something like the oil spill and they sense that enormous corporations and government agencies are struggling with what to do and they think, 'What can I do?'"

What they can do: donate money, fly down to the Gulf, proclaim that they care. For those looking for a human hook, Hawkins pointed to the future.

"We're going to be so sick, we're going to be so toxic," she said. "Our children are not going to have oceans. There are so many people who could be doing so much.

"And I just don't think they know. We should be going in bus loads and plane loads with hay and soaking up this stuff. We have to act like pirates."

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