Dr. Conrad Murray: Investigating Michael Jackson's Personal Doctor

Murray didn't set out to be a doctor to the stars. He was born on the Carribean island of Grenada in 1953. He was raised by his mother in neighboring Trinidad. She never married his father, Dr. Rawle Andrews, a renowned physician in Houston, Texas.

Murray was a customs clerk, a teacher and an insurance agent before beginning his studies at Texas Southern University at age 27. After graduating magna cum laude, he went on to medical school at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tenn. He then did his residency at Loma Linda University, in California, before eventually opening a practice in Houston, serving the largely poor, African-American community, where his father had been a local hero.

Murray's Doctor Dad Had Medical License Suspended

But while he was revered by his patients, Andrews, who's now deceased, came under scrutiny late in his career, foreshadowing the problems currently plaguing his son. Andrews had his medical license restricted by the board in 1994 for prescribing "controlled substances and substances with addictive potential" to two patients for "extended periods of time without adequate indication," according to documents obtained by ABCNews.com.

Murray's attorney's spokeswoman, Miranda Sevcik, said that any wrongdoing on the part of Murray's father has nothing to do with the son's predicament.

"This is not relevant to Dr. Murray or the investigation into Michael's death," Sevcik said.

She added that Murray, in 20 years of practicing medicine, has never had his license suspended or a malpractice claim filed against him.

"To me, that's much more relevant than what his dead father may have been accused of 25 years ago," Sevcik said.

As part of the five-year restriction of his medical license, Andrews was required to complete two two-week courses on pain management and the prevention and treatment of drug abuse. He was also required to keep separate records on any controlled substances he prescribed, to make those records available to the board and to appear before the board once a year.

After he complied with all the provisions, the restrictions on Andrews' license were lifted completely in 1999. He continued his practice, the Andrews Medical Clinic, which he had opened in 1964, until two months before his death in 2001.

News of Andrews' misconduct came as a surprise to the Rev. F. N. Williams, one of his longtime patients who also conducted his funeral.

"I think he was picked out by God to be a doctor," Williams said. "He had a concern and a caring heart. He turned nobody away. His office stayed packed. He would go home, get a call and go, just like the old country doctors that would go to the houses. He stayed with my mother 'til she passed."

Williams said Andrews was widely respected in the community.

"Whenever his foot hit the hospital, they started jumping," he said. "They knew if he found anything out of order, he would go to the supervisor of the hospital and say, 'You've got to get this corrected now.'"

Andrews' practice was in the Acres Homes area, an impoverished African-American neighborhood in northwest Houston. There, he helped form the Acres Homes Citizen Council, which gave a voice to the community and provided scholarships for needy students.

"He was the great leader of the community," Williams said.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
  • |
  • 3
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...