Not-So-Lucky Stars of Political Theater

"I spend 25 hours a week telling you the most intimate details of my life," he announced on his show. "If you want to know how much money I make, screw you. I am never going to tell you how much money I make."

The whole election may have been one big joke to Stern, who was promising to bring back the electric chair with the slogan, "A volt for every vote."

Still, he turned New York politics upside down. Incumbent Mario Cuomo and Republican George Pataki were locked in a tight race, and each was eager to cater to the Stern constituency, which was estimated between 5 percent and 10 percent of the electorate.

"Howard Stern believes in the death penalty, less taxes and more efficient government," Pataki spokeswoman Caroline Quartararo told newspapers. "Sounds like a George Pataki voter."

Pataki eventually won.

Here Come Old Flattop: In 1969, Timothy Leary, turned to John Lennon in his bid to challenge Ronald Reagan for the California governorship.

The celebrity drug guru asked Lennon to write a campaign song and the late Beatle delivered the hit "Come Together," which he saw as a "We Shall Overcome" for the hippy movement.

But by the time the 1970 election rolled around, Leary would be in prison, serving a 10-year sentence at the California Men's Colony at San Luis Obispo. While Leary escaped prison and fled the country, he was in no position to run for office, even in California.

Lennon's anthem, however, did have a second life in politics. At the Republican National Convention in 2000, Dick Cheney stepped to the podium to accept his party's nomination as vice president as the sound system played, of all songs, "Come Together."

The surreal lyrics, which begin, "Here come ole flattop, he come grovin' up slowly," didn't seem to bother Cheney or his staff, nor did the line, "got to be a joker he just do what he please."

In any event, for all Lennon and Leary's drugged-out indulgences, this is one thing they never could have imagined.

And it just goes to show you, in show business and politics, anything's possible.

Buck Wolf is entertainment producer at ABCNEWS.com. The Wolf Files is published Tuesdays. If you want to receive weekly notice when a new column is published, join the e-mail list.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
  • |
  • 3
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...