From Adele to Kiss' Paul Stanley: Why Are So Many Award-Winning Singers Undergoing Vocal Cord Surgery?

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When the vocal cords are damaged, Nasseri said minimally invasive surgery, the type Adele underwent, heals wounds with minimal risk.

"But we always use surgery as a last option, because everyone knows about Julie Andrews' voice," he said.

Andrews, the star of the original "The Sound of Music" and "Mary Poppins" films, lost her singing voice after a 1997 surgery. Her story remains a cautionary tale to other musicians. Recording artist Celeste Prince is slowly making a comeback after, she said, vocal problems and subsequent surgery ruined her signature raspy sound and threatened her career.

"It's a strange thing as a singer to know that you're signed and you're loved for a particular quality in your voice that then gets taken out of your own body," Prince said.

Since her recovery Prince said she was "relieved" to get her voice back.

"I was sexy again," she said.

Vocal coach Roger Love, who has worked with almost everyone in the music business from Gwen Stefani to Def Leppard, said he prefers to heal damaged vocal cords without surgery.

"Why would anyone want surgery?" Love said. "If I tell the artist that I can eliminate those calluses that are on their cords by teaching them how to sing better, who's going to take the knife? In my view the vocal cords are never better after surgery."

Love said he will lay down the law of good vocal practice with his top-tier singing clients, starting with proper vocal warm-up exercises before shows.

"If you went back stage to see any of my artists you would hear sounds like, 'goog goog goog goog,'" he said. "You would think that somebody was either having a small seizure or that they were warming up their voices."

Singers with raspy voices, such as Rod Stewart or Joe Cocker, have that unique throaty gurgle because their "vocal cords are not perfect," Love said.

"There are other ways of creating that sound without damaging your vocal cords," he said.

Even superstar music legends like Paul Stanley of KISS believe it's never too late to look after your voice. With thousands of performances and over four decades of touring, Stanley said those years of hitting screeching notes and high-octane stage raps can take their toll.

"As soon as you hit the stage, you are a complete idiot," he said. "People are cheering for you, so you do the impossible and when you don't have enough time to recuperate afterwards, it just catches up with you. Literally speaking my voice was cracking. It was cracking quite a bit on stage."

Those years of strain are why the Kiss vocalist had surgery on his vocal cords this year by the noted Dr. Steven Zietels, an otolaryngologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital Voice Center, who also operated on Adele.

"[Zietels] said my cords actually looked great for somebody who actually worked as much as I did and he did some minor things to mine," Stanley said. "It sounds way, way, way, way better."

It's good news for a nearly 60-year-old recording artist who is working on producing a new Kiss album.

"I lead a pretty good healthy life and I think at some point that really plays into it. That whole cartoon lifestyle that some people think is key to being a rock star is your demise," Stanley said. "Treat your voice like an instrument. We take pretty good care of our guitars our violins and our pianos but we kind of take our voice for granted. You know, warm it up, warm it down and give it a chance to rest."

ABC News' Lauren Effron contributed to this report

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