David Carradine Book Reveals Incest, Murder Suspicions

"I don't think he ever wanted to intentionally hurt anybody," said Anderson. "But when he passed away under the circumstances he did, he was handing the baton to me to correct people's thinking and explain why. I didn't want the last memory with the public to be just that. There's got to be an understanding now of him as a human being, not a celluloid fantasy, with faults and his own demons, and for people to understand why he was like this."

Anderson, who is also an author of children's books and designs jewelry, has made appearances on television's "Ghost Whisperers" and "Desperate Housewives." Last year, she was cast as co-lead in an episode of the NBC series "Unsolved."

Incest Destroyed Carradine-Anderson Marriage

Her book is a tribute to the continuing affection she said she still felt for Carradine, now eight years after their divorce. Anderson explores the most intimate moments of their relationship, as well as the actor's "dark side."

"I felt I had a very heavy responsibility to his fans, family and our relationship to see that my book was a balanced and truthful recount of our life together," said Anderson. "My memoir is very much a love story...I wanted people to know David as a man, not just an icon, with incredible talents and quirky idiosyncrasies.

"Fans may think this is a trash book, but it's not," she said.

Anderson's four-year marriage to Carradine was eventually derailed by incest. She won't identify the family member she calls, "X" -- not even the gender -- though she acknowledges the relationship was with a younger relative and spanned both his marriages to her and to his previous wife of 11 years, Gail Jensen

Anderson married Carradine after Jensen, a longtime friend, introduced them. Jensen died at the age of 60 this year after a fall linked to her long-time struggle with alcoholism.

"David did to her what he did to me," said Anderson. "Obviously, it was a major problem in the relationship. I wanted to confront him and help him move forward, but I could not."

In 2003 statements to a Los Angeles court when she filed for divorce from the actor, Anderson also said she had suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder after their http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/story?id=7777993">"roller coaster" marriage.

Anderson writes about pleading with Carradine to seek counseling for the incestuous relationship -- she had even caught him in a compromising situation with the younger relative in their home -- but he refused.

The incest sparked flashbacks to Anderson's own abuse by an uncle as a child, a trauma that she chronicles in the book with the help of "Celebrity Rehab" psychiatrist

Dr. Drew Pinsky. Pinsky also suggests that Carradine was addicted to opiates, which enabled him to sustain pain.

"Not to say he was addicted, but we had a lot of painkillers around," said Anderson. "I have a feeling he was taking some opiates along the way with the [erotic] asphyxiation -- taking it up a notch, escalating the activity to the next level."

Anderson, a Canadian-American, met Carradine in the 1970s, but they did not fall in love until they worked together in Toronto on the set of "Kung Fu: The Legend Continues," a television series that aired from 1993 to 1997. She played a variety of roles in different episodes of the series.

The couple called each other affectionately "Johnny" [Carradine was born John Arthur] and "Blackie" [for her raven hair].

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