Elin Nordegren on Tiger Woods: I Was 'Blindsided' By Affairs, She Tells People Magazine

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In the days that followed, there were reports of an alleged relationship between Woods, 34, and a New York City nightclub hostess. Before long, several other allegations were made about even more women.

And there was the now infamous voicemail, purportedly left by Woods for cocktail waitress Jaimee Grubbs.

In the message, a panicked voice identified as Woods by US Weekly apparently begs Grubbs to change her voicemail greeting. The voicemail is from Nov. 24, the day before reports of his alleged affairs surfaced, according to US Weekly.

"Hey it's Tiger. I need you to do me a huge favor," the caller says in the message. "Can you please, uh, take your name off your phone? My wife went through my phone and may be calling you. If you can, please take your name off that and, um, what do you call it, just have it as a number on the voice mail. Just have it as your telephone number. You have to do this for me. Huge. Quickly. Bye."

Couple Tried 'Really Hard' to Save Marriage

In the end, Woods was rumored to have been involved with more than a dozen women, including a porn star.

He eventually admitted he cheated. In an effort to save his marriage, he took time off from golf and sought treatment in a private clinic.

As all this unfolded, Nordegren said she experienced "absolute shock and disbelief."

"I felt stupid as more things were revealed -- how could I not have known anything? The word 'betrayal' isn't strong enough. I felt embarrassed for having been so deceived. I felt betrayed by many people around me," she said.

Even so, she wanted the marriage to work.

"Initially, I thought we had a chance, and we tried really hard," she said.

And although she wanted her children to have a family, she decided that it was better to split up.

"I am now going to do my very best to show them that alone and happy is better than being in a relationship where there is no trust," she said.

But Castro noted that both Nordegren and Woods seem to have worked out a good plan for co-parenting the kids. While the People reporter was with Nordegren at the house, Woods showed up unexpectedly to drop the children off. Nordegren, Castro said, took time to remind the kids to kiss their father good bye.

"It was a very, very pleasant scene and that was one of the surprising things," he said. "It shows very clearly there really is no animosity. Elin is moving on."

Nordegren Says She Never Attacked Woods

An intensely private woman, Nordegren maintained her silence even as she became the focus of the paparazzi and her marriage turned into fodder for the tabloid and mainstream media.

She described the past nine months as an "emotional roller coaster."

She lost sleep, weight, and even some of her hair. In an effort to avoid the constant coverage of her marriage, she watched virtually no television. But said she found the parodies of herself on Saturday Night Live and South Park "pretty hysterical," even if "totally untrue."

Also untrue, she said, was the suggestion that she attacked Woods on the night of the accident.

"There was never any violence inside or outside our home," she said. "The speculation that I would have used a golf club to hit him is just truly ridiculous. Tiger left the house that night, and after a while when he didn't return, I got worried and decided to look for him. That's when I found him in the car. I did everything I could to get him out of the locked car. To think anything else is absolutely wrong."

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