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  • Florence Welch's Style Evolution

    When she first started her career, Florence Welch of Florence + The Machine made her own clothes. Now she's a fashion icon, known for her wild, edgy looks. "Nightline" anchor Cynthia McFadden caught up with the lead singer before she appeared in a white Sarah Burton gown at the glamorous Met Costume Institute Gala on May 7, 2012 in New York City. Watch the full story on "Nightline" on May 8.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Shown here is Florence Welch performing on Nov. 6, 2007 in London, England. "I have been very lucky, because I have actually been allowed, it feels, to mature as an artist and to move beyond kind of how it started, which was me, an acoustic guitar, glitter all over my face, falling over, which was so much fun," Welch told "Nightline" anchor Cynthia McFadden.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence Welch backstage at the Deaf Institute in Manchester, England on Mar. 16, 2008. "I've always been interested in dressing up and kind of constantly in the fancy dress boxes as a kid... but when we started touring, at first I just wore boys clothes all the time and it was just me and two guys," Welch said.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence Welch of Florence + The Machine performs at the Reading Festival on Aug. 22, 2008. After "shlomping around" in her band mates' T-shirts for a year, Welch told "Nightline" she began wearing "more flamboyant" outfits after Isabella "Machine" Summers joined the group in 2007.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence Welch at the Brit Awards 2009 Nominations on Jan. 20, 2009 in London, England. Florence + The Machine released their debut album, "Lungs," in July 2009. Welch said, in the beginning, they were given about $10 a day for food and shopping. "We would go straight to the vintage store or the charity shop to kind of create these stage outfits because it became part of the fun," she said.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    From tomboy to top-tier fashion icon, Florence Welch of Florence + The Machine turns heads with her lavish outfits. "It kind of makes me feel better about myself kind of putting an outfit together," the flame-haired singer said. "It's part of what I enjoy about getting up." Shown here is Welch performing at Manchester Academy on Feb. 6, 2009 in Manchester, England.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence Welch at the Shockwaves NME Awards 2009 on Feb. 25, 2009 in London, England. "I don't know how people are not just scared on [the red carpet] because everyone is just shouting at you, just shouting, and there's so many flashing lights and in my head I'm just going like, 'show no fear, show no fear, keep a normal face, try to look relaxed.' How do you do that?" Welch told "Nightline."
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence Welch performing at T4 on the Beach on July 19, 2009 in Weston-Super-Mare, England.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence Welch of Florence + The Machine performs at Bestival on Sept. 11, 2009 on the Isle of Wight. The group was launched to international stardom when their smash hit single, "The Dog Days Are Over," released in the UK in 2008, was featured on several American television shows, including "Grey's Anatomy," "Gossip Girl" and "Glee."
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence Welch performs at Shepherds Bush Empire on Sept. 27, 2009 in London, England.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence + The Machine has won numerous awards overseas since the launch of their debut album. Here, Florence Welch poses with the award for "British Album" at The Brit Awards 2010 on Feb. 16, 2010 in London, England.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    "When I first started out, I never imagined that it would get this big," Florence Welch told "Nightline" with a laugh. "When you're first touring, it's like, 'Oh my God, this is amazing.' Someone gives us a bottle of vodka every night. We get to play a show at 7 o'clock. This is brilliant." Florence + The Machine shown here performing at Coachella on April 18, 2010 in Indio, Calif.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    The 25-year-old lead singer of Florence + The Machine, shown here at the 2010 MTV Video Music Awards on Sept. 12, 2010 in Los Angeles, Calif., said she hasn't stopped touring since she was 21. "I think that makes you feel... sort of contained and almost sort of slightly teenage bubble," Florence Welch said. "I've just managed to make steps towards moving out of my mom's house."
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence + The Machine's songs have been featured in the films "Twilight" and "Eat, Pray, Love," further helping the group stay on the U.S. pop charts. One recent project for Welch was recording a song for the upcoming film, "Snow White and the Huntsman." "One of my favorite things I've ever done was recording that song," she said.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence Welch is shown here at The 53rd Annual Grammy Awards on Feb. 13, 2011 in Los Angeles, Calif. Florence + The Machine were nominated for Best New Artist that year, but lost to Esperanza Spalding. Despite all of her recent success, Welch said she constantly has those "pinch yourself" moments.
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  • The Many Looks of Florence Welch

    Florence Welch performs at the 2012 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival on May 3, 2012 in New Orleans. "The stage has, especially now, become maybe the one place that hasn't changed," Welch said of performing. "Everything around me, my situation, what I'm doing every day is constantly unfolding and becoming stranger and stranger... on stage, it's kind of where no one can touch you."
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