Dallas Observer
  • 'Mad Men' - Era Advertisements

    "Mad Men," an AMC show about the sin, swagger and back-stabbing salesmanship of a New York City advertising agency in the 1960s, not only became a smash hit but also launched a cultural phenomenon. Harking back to an era when women were considered subservient to men, these are real ads from the 1960s. This American Airlines ad shows a flight attendant and the line, "Think of her as your mother."
    Dallas Observer
  • 'Mad Men' - Era Advertisements

    The show "Mad Men" takes viewers into the "real" 1960s, the pre-feminist era, through the antics inside the Madison Avenue ad agency Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce, and its competitors. This real ad for Delta Airlines from the 1960s shows another flight attendant waiting on customers with the line, "No floor show. Just a working girl working."
    Etsy
  • 'Mad Men' - Era Advertisements

    Since "Mad Men" premiered in 2007, the show has consciously formed a plot around ego-driven men working alongside women at a time when traditional family roles went unchallenged. In this actual 1960s ad for Van Heusen ties, a wife graciously serves her husband breakfast in bed with the line, "Show her it's a man's world."
    silverfox-whispers.com
  • 'Mad Men' - Era Advertisements

    "Mad Men" also includes numerous instances of women's demeaning roles before the feminist movement hit full-force toward the end of the 1960s, with the men of Sterling Cooper Draper Price openly commenting on a female co-workers' body shape, dress and manner. In this real '60s ad for a men's shoe company, a woman lies on the floor. "Keep her where she belongs ..." the slogan reads.
    silverfox-whispers.com
  • 'Mad Men' - Era Advertisements

    We've heard of the "tiger mom," but this 1970 advertisement for Mr. Leggs, a brand of men's trousers, wouldn't make it off the drawing board today. The ad features a man in business dress, with his foot atop a woman's head. The woman appears as the head of a tiger skin rug. "It's nice to have a girl around the house," the ad reads.
    silverfox-whispers.com
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    The 1960s was what Madison Avenue ad agencies called the era of "creative revolution." In her book "Mad Men Unbuttoned: A Romp Through 1960s America," author Natasha Vargas-Cooper said it was the first time ads tried to make an emotional connection to their target audiences. This 1964 advertisement for Chemstrand nylon underwear reads, "Nothing but nylon makes you feel so female."
    Apic/Getty Images
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    This real 1960s ad for Elite clothes from the Columbia Minerva Corp. reads, "Look 'Elite' in Reverie."
    Getty Images
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    The 1960s was also a time when TV advertising was starting to become more important to ad agencies. But their target medium was still magazines, with brightly colored spreads that focused less on art and more on photography. This 1963 advertisement for Cushionflor vinyl flooring reads, "So springy it even recovers from spike heel dents!"
    Getty Images
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    While more and more women began to earn advanced degrees, the message, conveyed largely through advertising, was that they were still expected to be perfect homemakers, wives and mothers. This 1964 Tri Chem advertisement for a liquid embroidery demonstration from McCall's says, "Put yourself right in the picture."
    Apic/Getty Images
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    This 1960s ad for the Bell Telephone System shows a wife smiling in the kitchen while her husband is on the phone making the decisions. "We'd like to have you visit us this weekend," it reads.
    Hulton Atrchive/Getty Images
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    This 1960s ad for Campbell's tomato soup shows three children in yellow raincoats playing in the mud. The ad reads, "3 customers for Campbell's coming up. Pretty soon they'll be good and ready for something good and hot."
    Apic/Getty Images
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    This 1960s advertisement for Lucky Strike cigarettes shows a businessman lighting up. The caption on the photo reads, "Big Meeting!" The hit TV show "Mad Men," set in the 1960s, stays true to the time period when smoking was widespread. Lucky Strike is one of Sterling Cooper Draper Price's clients. On the "Mad Men" set, though, the cigarettes are clove, not tobacco.
    Blank Archives/Getty Images
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    Another thing the characters of "Mad Men" seem never to be without is a drink. This 1960s advertisement from Gilbey's Gin reads, "Out-of-this-world for holiday entertaining."
    Hulton Archive./Getty Images
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    In this 1960s advertisement for General Motor's new Cadillac that promotes its radio system reads, "It's Easy to Be a Weatherman in a New Cadillac!"
    Getty Images
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    This 1964 advertisement for the F85 Cutlass car from Oldsmobile plays to men's love of horsepower during an era when Hollywood was churning out dozens of wholesome Westerns. Invoking the image of cowboys, the ad reads, "Nothing was spared (including the horses!)."
    Hulton Archive/Getty Images
  • "Mad Men Era" Advertisements

    This seemingly bizarre 1960s advertisement shows a Royal portable typewriter resting on a French horn, tied with holly. The caption reads, "A Christmas gift with keys so lively, they can go 115 words a minute. (That's the world's record, set on a Royal portable.)"
    Getty Images
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
See It, Share It
PHOTO: A home damaged by a landslide Friday, April 18, 2014 in Jackson, Wyo. is shown in this aerial image provided by Tributary Environmental.
Tributary Environmental/AP Photo
null
Danny Martindale/Getty Images
PHOTO: Woman who received lab-grown vagina says she now has normal life.
Metropolitan Autonomous University and Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine