Photo Courtesy of Lucy Cooke
  • NatGeo Uglies

    Lucy Cooke, a zoologist and emerging explorer, holds a sign on a boat that reads "Love Ugly." Cooke is the host of National Geographic's "Freaks and Creeps," the show that pays homage to the animal kingdom's unslightly outcasts. "Nightline" joined Cooke in the Amazon to take a look at a few creepy creatures. "Freaks and Creeps" is on Tuesdays at 10 p.m. ET on Nat Geo Wild.
    Photo Courtesy of Lucy Cooke
  • NatGeo Uglies

    For Cooke, ugly animals are cute, like the havoc-wreaking Tasmanian devil, and cute animals are sachrine and annoying. "I want to do a campaign to save ugly because ugly animals need love too and I'm sick of watching shows about lions and tigers and pandas," she said.
    Photo Courtesy of Lucy Cooke
  • NatGeo Uglies

    Shown here, a tailed emperor catepillar travels along the ground. Cooke said these animals might not be pretty to look at, but they are important. She said she is tired of all the money, research and conservation efforts going to charismatic species, like lions and tigers, and not equally endangered species.
    Photo Courtesy of Lucy Cooke
  • NatGeo Uglies

    Cooke travels the world, including to the small island of Borneo, in search of odd animals to gain a better understanding of why they look the way they do. In the past five years, scientists have discovered over 123 new species just on Borneo.
    Photo Courtesy of Lucy Cooke
  • NatGeo Uglies

    Check out that schnoz! Cooke traveled to Borneo, the only home of the proboscis monkey, to study why the animal looks so strange. These endangered monkeys can swim underwater for up to 65 feet, but deforestation threatens their populations.
    Photo Courtesy of Lucy Cooke
  • NatGeo Uglies

    The Cape Vulture is an endangered species and can only be found in large numbers in the Magaliesburg Nature Reserve in South Africa.
    Photo Courtesy of Lucy Cooke
  • NatGeo Uglies

    "I just want to tell stories about animals who don't normally get their stories told," Cooke said. In South Africa, Cooke got a hands-on view of the Sungazer Girdled Lizard.
    Photo Courtesy of Lucy Cooke
  • NatGeo Uglies

    Cooke holding a short-beaked echidna. Echidnas have a special muscle under the skin, around their bodies, that allows them to contort into very round or very flat shapes. They also use this muscle to move individual spines.
    Photo Courtesy of Lucy Cooke
  • NatGeo Uglies

    Cooke feeds Syd, the pangolin, milk formula, but he is also learning to like pangolins' natural food - termites. "Nature is like a game of Jenga--you don't know which block you will pull out that will make the whole thing collapse and it's not necessarily the cute and fluffy bits at the top that you need to preserve. You need to conserve the whole system," Cooke said.
    Photo Courtesy of Lucy Cooke
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