'Star Trek: The Original Series': Where Is the Cast 46 Years After TV Premiere?

Just don't call them Trekkies.

Many fans of the original "Star Trek" series prefer to be called Trekkers, and they know everything about its intricacies.

From the shape-shifting creature featured in the first TV episode on Sept. 8, 1966, to the last episode on June 3, 1969, when Capt. James Tiberius Kirk loses his consciousness to a woman determined to kill him, "Star Trek" has taken its viewers "where no man has gone before" -- over and over and over again.

Photos: Star Trek: Through The Years

Forty-six years after Gene Roddenberry created the original series, here's an update on the original cast members from a franchise now worth billions.

'Star Trek'

William Shatner (Capt. Kirk)

Please, no priceline.com jokes. William Shatner, 81, can shill all he wants for the online travel site, but there's no escaping the role that stuck to him like those pesky little Tribbles that redeemed themselves in the end. He also tours the country with "Shatner's World: We Just Live in It," a one-man show in which he takes audiences through his acting career.

'Star Trek'

Leonard Nimoy (Mr. Spock)

Any fan of the hit TV show "Fringe" will tell you that Leonard Nimoy, 81, is doing just fine, thank you. His recurring role as parallel-universe-hopping Dr. William Bell even evokes Mr. Spock at his dispassionate best.

Nimoy also keeps busy doing voice work, this year as Action Figure Spock in the "The Big Bang Theory," Master Xehanort in "Kingdom Hearts 3D: Dream Drop Distance" and Galactus in "The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes."

'Star Trek'

DeForest Kelley (Dr. McCoy)

Kelley died of cancer in 1999 at age 79 but there's a website "dedicated to the incredible DeForest Kelley and his wonderful life's work."

'Star Trek'

George Takei (Mr. Sulu)

George Takei, 75, does some marketing work of his own, sporting the classic Starfleet uniform for the Social Security Administration. "Boldly Go to www.socialsecurity.gov," the promotion reads, depicting him and actress Patty Duke. And since coming out publicly in 2005, Takei has become a prominent spokesman for gay rights. He also has a role in "Allegiance: A New American Musical," premiering this month in San Diego and depicting the weeks and years after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

'Star Trek'

James Doohan (Mr. Scott)

Doohan accomplished in death what he couldn't in life: a trip to the real final frontier. A private company flew some of his ashes, as requested in his will, into space earlier this year. He died in 2005 at age 85 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

'Star Trek'

Nichelle Nichols (Lt. Uhura)

Nichols, 79, has turned her attention to encouraging woman and people of other underrepresented groups to consider careers in space and aviation, particularly as astronauts. She appeared earlier this year at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, Calif., and the Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility in Palmdale.

'Star Trek'

Walter Koenig (Ensign Chekov)

Everything you want to know about Koenig, 75, can be found at his official website, including his busy appearance schedule. Next up is the Walter Koenig Star Celebration this weekend in Hollywood, Calif. He was the last of the seven main cast members to be awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

'Star Trek'

Majel Barrett-Roddenberry (Nurse Chapel)

Married to "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry for 22 years, Barrett-Roddenberry died of leukemia in 2008 at age 76. She was the only one to act in all six "Star Trek" TV series. Her remains are reportedly scheduled to be launched into deep space in 2014, along with a portion of her husband's ashes that weren't sent into Earth orbit in 1997.

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