For Some Students, 'Teen Mom' Isn't a Cautionary Tale

"Young girls go through pregnancies every day. They don't make it onto the covers of magazines," said Bragner. "That is not reality."

"The show has become too 'Hollywood,' too glamorized," said Ingram. "Whether subliminally or not, the show is teaching young girls that teen pregnancy is ok … that everything will be alright."

Carol Haynes-Hall, a pharmacist in Houston, Texas, says her 21-year-old daughter watches the show. She doesn't think it is enough to scare teens out of having sex.

"In the back of [their] heads, a lot of young people think that [this] will never happen to them," said Haynes-Hall. "And let's not talk about the STDs associated with having unprotected sex."

But Albert contends that nothing about the show is glamorous.

"If you think the show 'Teen Mom,' glamorizes teen pregnancy, than you must think 'The Biggest Loser' glamorizes obesity," said Albert.

'Teen Mom' Realities

Blockett and her friends who watch the show all agreed that the "16 and Pregnant" series was more humbling and didn't put teenage pregnancy in a glorified light. The show shed light on the difficulties of telling your parents you are pregnant, walking through the halls of high school being stared at and being pressured to graduate from high school while preparing to be a mother. The girls agreed that those realities were much more startling.

A child born to an unmarried mother has a 27 percent chance of growing up in poverty, according to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Teens and young adults who say the show puts teen pregnancy in a positive light aren't likely paying much attention to the black slates that appear at the end of some 'Teen Mom' scenes: "Teen Pregnancy is 100% Preventable."

Pregant Again?

At the beginning of Teen Mom's second season, two of the characters thought they might have be pregnant again.

"Amber thought she was pregnant again … she obviously didn't learn her lesson. Catelyn thought she was pregnant again too … the show makes pregnancy look ok," said Bragner.

"I don't think the show is the best birth control," said Blockett. "Kids are going to do what they want to do. I think it's important to not only preach abstinence, but teach the importance of protection."

ABCNews.com contributor Kyla Grant is a member of the ABC News on Campus program.

-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11872306. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11872306. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11872306. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11872306. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11872306. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11872306.
Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...