Whale Kills Shark, Setting Biology on Its Ear

Biologist Visser explained, "If you look at the definition of culture and you look a what's going on with these different populations of orca [whales] and the way they specialize in hunting, you can definitely say they have a culture... although it's something usually associated with humans."

Orcas -- like people --
          have different cultures:

Fish-eating cultures
          who educate their young

On how to catch fish;
           mammal-eating cultures

That teach pups how to capture
           seals and sea lions.

And how scared were the great whites
           when they fled from that scene?

Of the orca's attack?
          With telemetry tags,

The scientists followed
          one of the fleeing

Fiends and it's fellows
           who were finally found more

Than a thousand miles off.

Gruber showed National Geographic, using a laptop with telemetry tracking graph, that "The shark went down to 500 meters -- that's 1,500 feet -- that's a long way down. So that was a traumatic event for these sharks, who would normally be staying around there for the season."

"The Whale That Ate Jaws" premieres on the National Geographic Channel Saturday Nov. 28, at 8 p.m. ET.

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