Medical Identity Theft: How to Protect Yourself

2. It's a good idea to monitor any explanation of benefits that may be sent to you by insurers. If anything appears to be incorrect, contact the insurer or provider for a full explanation. If you get a statement that's not yours, don't ignore it simply because it may say you don't owe any money.

3. Request and review all the benefits that have been paid in your name by insurance plans to which you belong. You should do this at least once a year, and much more often if you think there may be a problem.

Click HERE for more prevention tips information from the FTC.

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