Michael Brewer Talks to Police for First Time After Burn Attack; Suspect's Brother Expresses Sympathy

Michael Brewer said his son is handling things well.

"Compared to a month ago, it's unbelievable," he said. "When it happened, he did just what I wanted him to do; find water to get in it, and put himself out. ... I asked him this morning, I said, 'You're still going to fight?' And, he said, 'of course.'"

Most of the 300 or so burn patients the center treats each year were injured in accidents, which makes Brewer's case so heartbreaking, Namias of Jackson Memorial told ABC News in a previous interview.

"This didn't have to be," he said.

"The burns are everywhere," he said. "It's the legs, it's the arms, it's his back, it's his buttocks ... it wraps around to the front."

Cadaver skin was stapled to what's left of Brewer's natural skin to give the excised wounds a chance to heal and regenerate tissue. The human body -- immune-suppressed because of severe injury -- typically accepts the new skin without rejection for some time.

Eventually, Namias said, Brewer's body will begin to reject the donor skin. When that happens, his doctors will assess how much grafting he'll need to cover what didn't regenerate.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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