Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    A block of ice floats in the Glacier Lagoon. Huge blocks of ice constantly break off the glacier, Breidamerkurjokull, and large icebergs float on the lagoon.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    The "snout" of a glacier. The bright white ice of the Arctic regulates the planet's temperature by reflecting solar energy back into space.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    A glacial mountain of ice. A number of recent studies show that the ice on both the North and South Poles is melting, and faster than previously thought.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    Mist over a green hill near the Glacier Lagoon. "Good Morning America's" Sam Champion reported live from a boat on Glacier Lagoon.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    A "Good Morning America" producer takes in the scenery at one of the northernmost points on Earth.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    Glacial runoff creates a small waterfall. NASA satellites have been monitoring polar ice since the 1970s and have found the perennial ice -- the kind that stays frozen all year -- shrinking at a rate of about 10 percent per decade.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    A boy washes his face in the Blue Lagoon, a popular attraction near Reykjavík. Temperatures at the man-made lagoon average about 104 degrees Fahrenheit, and the soothing, mineral-rich water is rumored to have curative powers.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    A solitary evening at the Blue Lagoon, called one of Iceland's most photographed sites.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    Both the North and South Poles experience full summer days of sunlight and full winter days of darkness, depending on which one is closest to the sun.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    The melting glacial ice often creates interesting shapes.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    Glacial cliffs are surrounded by snow. The North Pole is significantly warmer than the South Pole, with a toasty average temperature of negative 34 degrees Fahrenheit.
    Jim Carroll/ABC NEWS
  • Iceland

    Most of the Seven Wonders panelists agreed that the beautiful, disappearing polar ice caps should be one of the new wonders of the world. One panelist saw no wonder in the water, though. "I don't think it's a wonder. It's frozen water," astrophysicist Neil Degrasse Tyson said. <br> <br> <i>For more information on the polar ice caps, please visit the <a href="http://www.nsf.gov/home/polar/" target="external" class="blueLinkNoStyleFP" id="UL">National Science Foundation's Office of Polar Programs.</a> </i> <p>
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
  • Iceland

    Mountains ring the Glacier Lagoon in southeast Iceland. The Glacier Lagoon is about 350 kilomenter east of Reykjavík and one of the greatest wonders of nature in Iceland. Glacier Lagoon was formed fairly recently, the result of a warmer climate.
    Jim Carroll/ABC News
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