"Will Work From Home" Book Excerpt

You don't have to know these trends to work from home, but doesn't it add to your confidence? There are going to be more people working from home in the future. There's no reason why you shouldn't be one of them.

One Solution for Many Needs

The beauty of this "Will Work from Home" movement is that one solution is the answer to so many different scenarios.

Not working isn't an option. We need to support or totally earn our household budgets. We just want a better way of doing it so that we can feel more successful at both. Wouldn't working at home simplify our lives, save us time and possibly money? Probably.

If you interrupted a career you love to stay home and raise your children, your issues are slightly different. You plan to continue your career someday, but you need a way to keep your contacts fresh and your skills sharp. You need a flexible job at home.

An at-home job is also a solution for fathers who want to get off the corporate treadmill, take more control of their careers, and play a greater role in parenting.

It's an answer for singles and couples without children who want more freedom to pursue hobbies, volunteer in the community, or travel. It's ideal for those with health challenges that preclude them from working outside the home.

If you're a baby boomer who is ready to lose the five-day week, nine-to-five schedule, but not ready to rock on the front porch, keep reading. A job at home or your own business could take you closer to your grandchildren or the golf course. It could offer work that is more fun or challenging and grow your retirement income.

Some of you may desperately need to take time off from the office routine to care for aging parents, or a spouse or child with a chronic illness. You may find yourself living in a different city or a remote area with massive unemployment or few jobs. If you have physical or medical limitations, you need real work that you can do without a commute. You may be newly widowed or divorced and need a way to support yourself.

Chef Erika Connell Cooper knew that she wanted to work with food by age fourteen. She held jobs in bakeries, catering companies, and restaurants before entering the New England Culinary Institute. After a job as a baking consultant with King Arthur Flour, she earned a bachelor's degree in food and beverage management.

Teaching business courses at her culinary institute, she met her husband, a fellow chef. In one year, the couple married, had a daughter, Greta, and moved to upstate Vermont. "We both felt that one of us should stay home with Greta, and for lots of reasons the best choice seemed to be me," she says. "I can't begin to tell you the feeling of isolation -- being in a remote area of New England in winter with a newborn baby -- but we made it."

After eight months, her husband became the executive chef for a restaurant chain, and the couple moved back to Massachusetts near family. Cooper continued to stay home with her daughter, and did some catering and teaching. When she had a job, her husband or parents kept Greta.

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