Cracking 'The Da Vinci Code'

On Oct. 13, 1307 -- Friday the 13th -- Philip the Fair, the king of France, arrested the knights on charges of heresy, accusing them of everything from ritualized sodomy to urinating on crosses, said Griffith-Jones. He seized their treasury and kept it all.

The arrests, interrogations, torture and trials took five years and were spectacularly brutal, said Griffith-Jones. The knights were wiped out and buried in The Temple Church -- their secrets buried along with them.

But do those secrets include information on Mary Magdalene? Griffith-Jones says no.

"The real secret of the Knights of Templar has nothing to do with Mary Magdalene and everything to do with international banking," he said.

So does this put an end to the speculation surrounding the mysteries of "The Da Vinci Code?" That's highly unlikely, considering a film version of "The Da Vinci Code" is set to be released in 2006, directed by Ron Howard and starring Tom Hanks.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
  • |
  • 3
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
A Gilchrist county sheriffs car sits at the end of a trailer home where 7 members of a family were slain by their grandfather in Bell, FL, Thursday, Sept., 18, 2014. The grandfather, Don Spirit, pictured, also killed himself.
Phil Sandlin/AP Photo | Gilchrist County Sheriffs Office
PHOTO:
St. Andre Bessette Catholic Church in Ecorse Michigan
PHOTO: Phoenix police officers escort Arizona Cardinals running back Jonathan Dwyer, to the 4th Avenue Jail following his arrest, Sept. 17, 2014 in Phoenix.
The Arizona Republic, David Kadlubowski/AP Photo