Aimee Copeland Interview: 'I'm Alive, I'm Celebrating'

The young woman talks to Josh Elliott about her battle against a flesh-eating disease.
3:00 | 09/12/12

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Transcript for Aimee Copeland Interview: 'I'm Alive, I'm Celebrating'
Aimee copeland, the young woman who has inspired so many with her brave battle against a krishs, flesh-eating disease. Josh, you had a chance to sit down with her. And what a spirit. If you saw her on katie couric's new show yesterday. I was told she was an extraordinary woman. It was undersold. She is the personification of courage and hope and belief. And she says, despite everything that happened to her, she loves her life even more now. Meeti meeting aimee copeland for the first time is an experience unlike any other. The 24-year-old exudes life and love. And a boundless sense of optimism. Admirable qualities most. But extraordinary in someone who so recently endured so much. Copeland's story began on may 1st, WHEN A ZIP LINE ADVENTURE With friends took a perilous turn. I remember hearing the sound of the wire snapping. The next thing I know, I'm on the ground. Reporter: Copeland got the injury would heal in a matter of days. But lurking in her body, a deadly bacteria, likely from the river in which she plunged. It's difficult to diagnosis. Reporter: The flesh-eating bacteria ravaged copeland's body for days, then weeks. Taking with it, both of her hands, both of her feet, and her entire left leg. Just jump on the mat. And we'll get xarted with the exercises. Reporter: Despite very slim odds, copeland survived. Do you have why me moments? Not really. I don't think along those I was in this situation. So, that's how the cookie crumbles. Reporter: Now, out of the hospital, copeland is learning to embrace what she calls a new normal. What's been the hardest thing to relearn? There's so much. I think styling my hair is really complicated. I actually think after I get home, I'm chopping it all off because it's one of those things, it's not even relearning. It's just -- just doesn't happen. Brushing my teeth is really hard. Putting on makeup. Getting dressed. Reporter: You are obviously tall. I'm tall myself. What's it like to have your whole world view change now? Oh, it's terrible. I hate it. I hate having to look up at people. It's a different view because I'm, you know, 5'8". I'm used to looking down at people or at least eye-level. I'm be glad when I'm vertical a lot more. Reporter: Copeland's wish to stand tall again will soon be granted. This is below the knee. Reporter: Thanks to the new prosthetic she began using last week. On tuesday, in front of the studio audience of katie couric's new show, she showed just how quickly she's learned to master the new leg. But just as impressive as her newfound ability to walk and work her hand held device, is her determination to simply live her life. Is it fair to say, maybe, that for all the changes in your life, that you've emerged the saerson in the end here? Uh-huh. Absolutely. This is the better version. It's just something where you say, hey, this is hard. But we're going to make the best of it because, hey, I'm alive. I'm celebrating. You know? I'm celebrating the fact that I'm here right now. And I shouldn't be. You know? So, I think -- I feel like i beat all the odds, really. That's incredible. What's next for her? A couple of things. It's very funny. She's very happy to be home. Her home has been retrofitted for her new life. But she said, I'm away from home for six years before this. And she's jonesing for a little independence. She's going to learn drive again. And she wants to complete her masters thesis. She was getting a masters degree in ecopsychology. She wants to use the outdoors to help people recover from injuries. In this case, amputees. And to that end, she calls herself her own case study.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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