Amy Robach's Fight Against Breast Cancer

Robach talks about her double mastectomy and the importance of mammograms.
3:00 | 12/05/13

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Transcript for Amy Robach's Fight Against Breast Cancer
back here. And the cover of "people" magazine right now. There you are. Looking gorgeous. Thank you. Also, telling just a -- it is a beautiful story. You open up about this challenge and how you're dealing with it. You look great. How are you feeling? I'm feeling really good. I was thinking about it. It's three weeks to the day that I went into surgery. Right now, three weeks ago, i was in an operating room. And physically, I feel remarkably well. Mentally, it's another challenge because that was phase one, as anyone who has gone through this battle, as robin has, knows that's the first step. But the next couple ones are going to be tougher. And mentally, I think, is the toughest part of it because, robin, you gave me some greetat advice. You have to go hour-by-hour on this one. And it forces you to live in the moment. I think that's a good lesson for everyone. If you look at the positive out of this, there are days if you let your mind wander, it's fairly devastating. But you keep your head together. You come into work. You hug your friends. And you're thankful to be where you are with your family and the people who matter. And the next step for you? The next step is chemotherapy. AND THAT BEGINS DECEMBER 16th. I mentioned in the article that it had -- I made the choice to have the double mastectomy. And for me, it felt like the right choice. And it turned out to be the right choice. Not only did they find another malignant tumor, they saw problems in my left breast, as well, that looked like it was going to be problematic later on, as well. It also spread to my lymph node. And that was the devastating news to me. The first question I asked was, did it spread to my lymph nodes? That's the difference between chemo and no chemo. So, chemo begins for me in a little under two weeks. But you're working through it? I'm going to work through it. I saw robin do it. I know how strong you were. And you give me strength, robin, because it is important to get up and have something to do each day, even if you don't feel great. And even if you feel crappy. And they have all these new drugs to make it less difficult. I have four months of chemo. Some people have it harder than I do. I will take it hour-by-hour. You are so strong. And seeing -- it was so great to see you. I know you came to see sam off yesterday. And to spend some time with you yesterday was terrific. And you did mention something. You mentioned the article, as well. You're really happy you had this mammogram when you did. You maybe wish you had it sooner. And I want to say today, speaking to the good folks in detroit, wxyz-pvi in philadelphia. They said so many viewers after your public diagnosis, went out and got mammograms, as well. I had had that prescription for a full year. And I didn't go. And cancer spreads. And the sooner you get it, the better your prognosis. And with the fda regulations being that women can wait until they're 50, it was my excuse to say, eh, I can wait a couple years. Some doctors say 40. Maybe I'll split the difference. That could have meant, probably would have meant the difference between life and death for me. 40 for me was the right time. But 39 probably would have been better. And how happy we are to have you back. And your family, beautiful pictures in "people" magazine. Thank you. They spent time with you over thanksgiving. And I know you're fighting for yourself. But you're fighting for them, as well. It was a very special thanksgiving. We went around and said what we're thankful for. We usually say, whatever happened that year. And I uttered words I never thought I would utter. And I'm thankful to be alive. And it's good to know that you get to be thankful to be alive. It's a reminder to all of us that you never know what's around the corner. And so are we. Thank you. Great to have you here.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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