Earthquake Shakes Southern California

Quake and aftershocks rattle nerves and have many worried about what's coming next.
3:00 | 03/31/14

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Transcript for Earthquake Shakes Southern California
We want to turn to the new video of the earthquake and the over 100 aftershocks that have rattled southern California. Millions of people on edge worrying about what might happen next. Ryan Owens is in Pasadena with the latest. Good morning, Ryan. Reporter: Good morning, rather rlara. We're inside Cal tech. The university where they have had a buzzy weekend. See the red dots there, each one of those, an aftershock. They haven't caused damage. They sure take a psychological toll. Oh, my gosh. Reporter: The 5.1 quake wasn't the big one. But it was big enough. Watch how the jolt upstaged this high school musical Friday night. Ladies and gentlemen, remain seated. We had major earthquake. Stand by please. Reporter: The epicenter was in Orange county. It did more than rattle nerves. Look inside this man's house. Everything was on the floor. Most of the dishes I have left are in the dishwasher. Reporter: Outside, it cracked some of his neighbors' foundations. Everyone triggered a small rock slide. Nobody was seriously hurt. What's happened since Friday has left a lot of people on edge. Glass was everywhere. Reporter: More than 100 aftershocks this weekend. Our affiliate, KABC caught one on camera. Whoa, whoa, whoa. We're still feeling earthquakes. Every time we have another aftershock, it rattles you. The kids are more scared than anything. Reporter: There's a small chance, less than 5%, that this quake was a foreshock, a preview of a bigger one. Still, seismologists say it's a matter of time. They say there's a 99% chance of a 6.7 or larger quake somewhere in California in the next 30 years. Si seismologists assure us these are perfectly Normal. We haven't had one strong enough to seal since Saturday night, so fingers crosseded. Thank you, Ryan. More now from earthquake expert Dr. Lucy Jones, a seismologist with the U.S. Geological survey. Thank you for joining us. Tell us what the aftershocks mean and what they don't mean. They mean that this is a Normal earthquake. We should expect to have them like this. They're decaying just like we would expect. Not necessarily, as Ryan said, a sign of bigger things to come, though it's been about 20 years since a major earthquake in California. Well, that's right. Not in California, just -- L.a., sorry. Anything, really, in the L.A. Ar area, we haven't had anything close to this where we used to have them every year at this level. The last 20 years have been some of the quietest we have seen. We have to return to a Normal level. We haven't stopped plate tech on the ix. What should we expect? It might be a flurry. It might go back down. It's like saying this this storm connected to climate change. You have to wait to see if the pattern develops. This was on the hills that were especially dangerous? It's not on it buzz above it. Associated with it. It's a fault that doesn't move nearly as often's the San Andreas. But, because it runs right under downtown Los Angeles, it's like the most damaging earthquake that we can imagine happening in this area. Dr. Jones, thank you for your insight.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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