Experts Saying Parents Are Underestimating the Weight of Their Children

Studies show that 25 percent of parents underestimate the weight of their children, which is leading to childhood obesity.
2:50 | 08/01/14

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Transcript for Experts Saying Parents Are Underestimating the Weight of Their Children
surprising new findings about weight and the way we see ourselves. A new study reveals 25% of kids and parents underestimate their weight and the results can have costly consequences. ABC's Paula Faris has the story. Reporter: Call it the Augustus effect. You can find a ticket. Reporter: Parents seemingly unconcerned and in some cases oblivious to obesity in their own children. In fact, a brand-new study shows 25% of parents underestimate the weight of their children while 27% of children and teens underestimate their own weight. And experts say that's a big problem. Parents often feel that kids will outgrow their overweight and I always tell them, not likely to happen so we need to make some changes and doing it earlier is much better and much easier than waiting for something to happen later. Reporter: The study cites some startling statistics. Obesity in American children has doubled over the last 30 years and tripled in add less sends and as of 2010, nearly 1/ of children and adolescents living in the U.S. Were overweight or obese. So why do some parents seem to turn a blind eye in the battle of the bulge? Sometimes it's cultural beliefs. Stipes it may be by admitting your child isover weight you then have to confront, you know, the problem and then do something about it and some parents are reluctant to do so. For "Good morning America," Paula Faris, ABC news, New York. And joining us now is ABC senior medical contributor Dr. Jen Ashton and what is your take on study. It draws attention to the fact we have misperceptions of our own ideal body image and therefore have misperceptions of our children and still having difficulty reconciling a number that we see on a scale or a size with real internal measures of health, wellness and well-being and until we get that right, we're going to have that disconnect between obesity and poor health. Zero in on teens. Why is that age group particularly tricky. This is a massive period of time change, metabolically hormonally, nutritionally. When we see a change in eating habits that you can skip meals, the beverage consumption changes massively. Less milk, more sugar sweetened benches and see risk factors for eating disorders. Speaking of that as a parent, what do you say to your children so that doesn't become a problem. What we all try to do lead by example. They're not only listening to our words but they're watching what we do and if you yourself are overweight or unhealthy that can be passed along to your kids. All right, Jen, thanks so much. Are parents responsible for their kids being overweight. Tweet us @gmo or #socialscare. Pregnancy photos unlike

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