Criegh Deeds Blames Mental Health System for Son's Death

Virginia state senator speaks out about the murder-suicide attack by his son that hospitalized him.
3:00 | 11/27/13

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Transcript for Criegh Deeds Blames Mental Health System for Son's Death
Now, to the virginia state senator recovering from an attack by his son. Creigh deeds is blaming local authorities for his son's suicide. And vowing to improve mental health services. Abc's jim avila has the story. Reporter: Senator deeds blames virginia's mental health system for not keeping his son, gus, hospitalized, the day before he shot himself to death. E-mailing a local reporter, I'm alive for a reason. And I will work for change. I owe that to my precious son. The senator says he has strong opinions about the state agency that released his son, gus, after a mandatory four-hour psychiatric evaluation, saying they could not find an available bed for him. The attempted murder/suicide, happened just hours later. And deeds wrote, I feel like they are responsible. Close friends of gus tell abc news, they saw signs of mental illness ever since his father lost the virginia governor's race in a landslide. And then divorced gus' mom. He was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. And did get treatment. And for a while, I know he was on medication. Reporter: Tony walters knew gus since they were kids in rural virginia. And followed him to college at william and mary, where he watched as the sweet banjo-playing music student suddenly disappeared. He withdrew from school and his friends. He seemed scattered and different. Had strange paranoias. Do you think he could hurt someone? Do you think he could hurt himself? While we were in touch, I feel like we were all felt like, well, you know, gus is still -- still gus. He wouldn't do that. Reporter: The inspector general's office in virginia are investigating why there were no beds available for gus. Senator deeds hopes to be an advocate for change in mental health. But he cannot talk publicly. I cry a lot and I cannot focus and talk to anyone.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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