Daylight saving time is coming

Dr. Juan Rivera discusses ways to minimize any health effects from the change in time.
2:15 | 03/11/17

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Transcript for Daylight saving time is coming
Tonight we spring ahead to daylight saving time but setting ahead our clocks forward an hour means we lose an extra hour of sleep so making this transition we are joined by Dr. Juan Rivera. He is the chief medical correspondent for univision network. Great to have you in studio. Thanks for flying in from Miami. Absolutely. It is a pleasure to be here. We're only talking about one hour of sleep. Really how much can that disrupt our schedules. People think it's just one hour but studies have shown that it's one hour per day in some instances so what happens when we lose one hour a day, we sleep less than seven hours a night. Our stress hormones take over and when our stress hormones take over our blood pressure goes up. One of the things we can see an increase in cardiovascular risk and heart attacks on Monday, the risk can increase 10 to 20%. The other thing that is important is we see on Monday an increase of about 8% in car accidents so people have to be careful behind the wheel and then overall people are more moody, they're in a bad mood, poor concentration. You're making it sound so grave. Bad week to ask for a vacation or salary increase. Don't do it. Good week, though, to call off. Daylight saving time can affect your waistline. How so? Absolutely for people that are on a diet obviously millions of people, what happens is those stress hormones that I was telling you about, they take over. Stress hormones like cortisol, they increase and guess what happens, another hormone, the hunger hormone growling takes over and we can consume an extra 300 to 400 calories a day, so that's enough to hijack your diet. Real quick, a couple of takeaways. Best ways to actually cope for the loss of sleep. I'll give you a different type of advice. A grandma advice. So I want you to do two things, okay, the first thing you'll do is every night you're going to take passion fruit tea. That increases neurotransmitter that makes us go to sleep and high business cuss tea decreases our blood pressure and decreases the risk of a heart attack. Dr. Juan Rivera, thank you very much for coming in. All Dan Harris took away is he can call in sick tomorrow. We'll be right back with "Pop

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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