Avalanche Survivor: 'It Happened Really Fast'

Elyse Saugstad discusses the avalanche at a Washington ski resort.
3:18 | 02/20/12

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Transcript for Avalanche Survivor: 'It Happened Really Fast'
Joining us now on the skiers who survived the avalanche -- an air bag installed in her best much like the ones you find. In your car police -- that joins us now from Seattle Washington and -- -- we're thinking of the families who lost. All loved ones in this in -- avalanches. And I know that you -- to extremely well how are you doing this morning -- Com I'm doing well all things considered I am I believe I'm still in shock and I'm obviously just devastated by the loss of our friends my heart goes out to. Their families and in this teen community what we share the sentiments. Could you tell us what happened just before the avalanche. Well we where. At the top of our run and we were going through the back -- -- scheme protocol that. That we used to. Take one -- when we're on the back country and when this happens. We. I think that there's a few of us there were down below the avalanche and that's how we got caught in it and we were in -- safe zone or what we thought to be a safe zone. And end up being swept in the ambulance and what's going through your mind when you see. This happening and and having them react so quickly as you did. Well it happens a really really fast. Ultimately I think. You. You don't have much time to react and the first thing that came to my mind was to. Deploying Miami avalanche air -- device. And you have one there with you can you show us. How does yes I think a lot of people are not familiar with parents. Rate denied -- some you know it's a very relatively new thing in North America it's been in -- for awhile but. You know in North America it's he had some -- There's basically a system -- have a lever on year on the chest part of the backpack it's just normal backpack and when you pull the lever. -- -- -- -- as a nitrogen cartridge in -- deploy is this. The air bags to fill up with -- and what it essentially does is it keeps you above the avalanche I'm not above -- -- but. And so you've seen on top and -- and I'll say it's not like here actually. Having an inner tube ride down the snow it's definitely not like that you are still very much in the avalanche itself it's kind of like you're in a washing machine -- being tossed and turned you don't know which way. His -- down by the but the system keeps you up above so. You have a very good chance of survival. If preventing you from being completely buried in the snow -- was here you're facing your hands -- -- -- -- were able to get. Future Hanson to free yourself a little bit more. No no. Essentially that the snow in an avalanche the way it compacts. It literally was like being in cement II there is no way I could see myself I couldn't even. All they -- do is just help keep the snow off may face once I was buried. And just waited for. My friends to help come and bury me. And they were there to quickly get you and -- so. Helpful to that -- that bright color and so people are able to see. In the snow at least thank you very much again we're thinking of you and and all those affected and we thank you for sharing your story with -- then take care --

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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