Does Eating Before Bed Really Pack on the Pounds?

ABC News' Dr. Jennifer Ashton discusses new findings that might say otherwise.
1:46 | 07/28/14

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Transcript for Does Eating Before Bed Really Pack on the Pounds?
here. Won't catch on. No. Eating before bed, not to do it, supposed to cause weight gain. That may be changing, and Dr. Jen Ashton, tracking this. What's going on here? Not so fast. Don't rush into the kitchen. We need to reconcile the world of medicine and nutrition. Disclaimer, this does not apply to people with diabetes. But there's a lot of myths that we need to stabilize blood sugar levels. If you're healthy, your liver and fat stores do a good job on your own. That's not a reason to eat before bed. The other thing is, you're not really fasting with a typical six to eight hour sleep. It doesn't kick in until 24 hours, and we need those sir kad Yan rhythms to tell us to power down I'm against this in principle, it's not metabolically necessary. What if you're hungry? Eating dinner, we don't to want eat a big meal. Have your dinner two to three hours before. Eating a big meal can disrupt your sleep. A little snack, bring on sleep. What kind of snacks are we talking about here? There's really good literature to support a little bit of protein right before bed to help you build muscle mass. A little cheese with whole wheat crackers, some peanut butter on an apple, maybe even some Turkey. Do not rush to the restaurant or raid your pantry at 10:00 at night. Ice cream, cereal, cookies -- Definitely avoid. You have heard it here.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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