Ewan McGregor dishes on 'Beauty and the Beast'

The actor discusses his role in the upcoming remake of the beloved classic.
5:25 | 03/14/17

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Ewan McGregor dishes on 'Beauty and the Beast'
We have Stanley Tucci was here. You had a great time at the premiere. Yes, Stanley is a great find of mine. We worked together in "A life less ordinary" in 1976 or something and we've been friends ever since and every now and again we come back together on a movie and we did a film called "Jack the giant killer or slayer" and have such a great relationship. I adore that man. Your wife is French and in this movie you have a great French accent. Did you learn from her. I thought I would just -- I was a little lazy because I've lived with that all these years. My French accent will be perfect. And I turned up to London to -- we had to -- the household items of which I'm one, we recorded all our dialogue so that when the arcs who are doing the live action stuff are on set they had voices to play back to, you know, to listen to. When they were acting to tennis balls and such. They were looking at and I went in -- I swarmed in to record mine but my French accent wasn't very good at all and they also -- Disney wanted certain -- had the hard her sound, the French and they didn't want that so they wanted an "R." That made it -- Like a pirate. Like Spanish or Mexican so luckily bill con done, the wonderful director, I said to him, I said, look, please let me back and do it again when you're finished so -- You got a do-over. I got to rerecord all my dialogue so it's slightly more French now. Can I ask -- can we get a handle on what your first round sounded and your redo sounded like. An example. She is the girl and she is the girl. Oh. The second one is better. It is more French, yes. The first one -- Yes. ??? Be our guest ??? I haven't recorded a big song like that since "Moulin rouge." No pressure whatsoever. No, not really much. So, how is your lumiere different from the one we know, the original. I don't know because I don't really know the original one. Really. No -- You didn't go back. No, because I've played parts on stage or, yeah, on stage I guess that other people have played in Shakespeare and played diego and amazing actors have played it before and the last thing you want to do is ask them how to do it and if it was a movie you wouldn't want to go and watch that person do it because you want to make it your own, you know and I think the writing was very good and bill Condon's direction is good so I let them lead me and make it my lumiere. And the results. Look. I am telling you this girl is the one. They must fall in love if we are to be human again and how can they fall in love about she stays in her room. Chape. A, you missed a stop. My broken clock is right two times a day Mon Ami. It's time. How was it singing for the first time since "Moulin rouge." Wonderful. I loved it. It's very special thing to make music. You know, it's a wonderful -- if I hadn't been an actor I think maybe that's what I would have liked to have done. Such a pleasure to make music. When you're recording a big number like this, it's very exciting. An orchestra behind you as I have right now and I never leave home without one. You said "Moulin rouge." Such a great movie. That might be what I watch today. Great movie. "Beauty and the beast" is great. We have been waiting a long time for this movie but we also have been waiting a long time for "Trainspotting," the sequel. 21 years. Yes. And the sequel comes out this week. So, have fans been asking you about that when they see you? When is the sequel? The sequel is set 20 years later and Irvin Welsh wrote a sequel to his novel which came out about ten years after the "Trainspotting" novel came out and the novel is Scotland was sort of a book of my generation. It was an enormous success and a wonderful book that sort of defined that time and when a sequel -- when he wrote his -- I'm not going to say the name of his second book because I'm on breakfast television but came out ten years later and at that point, I don't think there was a script that came out of it that was good enough for Danny to send to us so it took another ten years really for them to nail it and what the film has in it which is really deep, I think, is this sense that man in this case because it's primarily about four boys in their mid-40s approaching their 50s so start looking back on their lives and then in our case looking back on our youths and that is the "Trainspotting" film we all know and love. Powerful? And through that sort of retrospective looking back trying to figure out how they're going to move forward. What was my life going to be like and I'm starting to sense that a little bit at my age. Right. And I think that's what this encapsulates and wouldn't have done if we had done it ten years ago because we would have been too young. Got to get a question from

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":46106864,"title":"Ewan McGregor dishes on 'Beauty and the Beast'","duration":"5:25","description":"The actor discusses his role in the upcoming remake of the beloved classic. ","url":"/GMA/video/ewan-mcgregor-dishes-beauty-beast-live-gma-46106864","section":"GMA","mediaType":"default"}