Families Mark 1st Anniversary of Sandy Hook Elementary School Shooting

Race4Chase foundation created in memory of slain student helps kids experience love of racing.
3:00 | 12/13/13

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Transcript for Families Mark 1st Anniversary of Sandy Hook Elementary School Shooting
to be talking about this morning and probably have been thinking about for the better part of a year. And it is an inspiring one, that I promise. As tomorrow will mark one year since the senseless and brutal tragedy in newtown, connecticut. Some of the grieving families have found ways to heal and to step from their darkness and to give back to all of us after losing so much. I had a chance to speak to two parents whose strength and spirit will stagger. Chase kowalski ran his first race at just 2 1/2 years old. At age 6, he competed in and won his first triathlon. They put the number on his arm. Pin it on you. Let me tell you. He had that on for two weeks. Loved it. He told his kindergarten teacher, I was in the triathlon. And she was like, really? Reporter: Dylan was a schoolmate of chase's. His family had moved from england to newtown, connecticut, because they found it idyllic. He was just pure joy. And his word was again. Whatever you were doing. Reporter: Chase and dylan were among the 26 lost in sandy hook elementary, one year ago. What was your experience? What you are experiencing there in the location, in the firehouse. And physically unable to move with this information being thrown at you. And it's almost like physical blows. That friday, I don't think we thought we would ever be able to really deal and cope. Reporter: But two days later, rebecca says, her son, chase, came to her in a vision. That vision totally repaired my heart. And just made it -- it's so hard to describe and explain. But it keeps us, just, going. Reporter: They created race for chase, a foundation in his memory, to bond families together, in the shared love of racing. People just show up. You know? They're present. They're here. And they tell us, you know, I'm doing this for your son. I'm doing this because of your son. It's beautiful. Reporter: You're saying there's a good world out there? Yeah. For all the bad, there's a lot of good. Yep. Uh-huh. Reporter: As the chaos and heartbreak engulfed them, dylan's weather, ian, turned to running as therapy and escape. Putting one foot in front of the other is like getting up every day. We've got to get up every day for 365 days every year, for however many years. Reporter: What was it that you were carrying with you as you ran? So, you get out on the road. And it starts to get hard. And then, it hits you why you're training. And then, it wells up inside you. It chokes you up for a moment. And you almost feel like you have to stop. But then, you burn through and you go on. And you really know what you're doing. And you can overcome anything. Reporter: Ian now runs with members of the foundation that he and his wife, nicole, created. Dylan's wings of change, to raise awareness and funds for children of autism. Are you grieving still? I and I hope I don't stop, really, because when I'm grieving, I'm remembering him. And I can turn it around and use it and take energy from that. And go on. Reporter: Rebecca and steve have kept chase's bedroom untouched. The calendar he updated every day without fail, now colorfully FROZEN ON DECEMBER 14th, 2012. Do you talk to chase? I don't speak out loud to him. We have our in my head conversations. Reporter: How do those go? They're mostly in the shower. And it's just kind of, how I'm doing. How I miss him. Sometimes he just gives me the words. Reporter: Do you talk to him? Yeah. Mostly in the garage. Reporter: Are you doing stuff? Are you explaining stuff? What are your -- just more I miss him. You weren't supposed to do that. Reporter: You look back at yourself a year ago. Can you see how far you've come to now? I've changed direction from the person that was going this way and thought that was his route and that was his family's route. And it's like, complete change of direction. And so, I'm going to a new place now. Reporter: What role, if any, does fear play in your life now? You just leave this as being a senseless act. And that just gives energy. Fear is negative. But on the other side is inspiration and the desire to go on and build and change. So, you've got to flip it round. Everything is about flipping emotions. Not hate. No hate. Flip it over. The other side is love. Take that and build because once you push the hate out, the love just flows in. And flows and flows. Dylan, you see him there. He was autistic. And it was he who was found in the arms of his teacher and friend, anne marie murphy. Ian and nicole says it gives them a tremendous amount of peace. And it is certainly a peace that we all wish for all of them in the days and months and the years to come. And we want to thank the kowalskis and the hochulis for letting us in for seeing the bad and the good that can perhaps come from it. It was very giving of them to do that. It's been a difficult time, needless to say. And tomorrow, the anniversary. And newtown has said, you know what? To the national media, let us be by ourselves. And the fact that everyone is listening to that. It was so nice of them. So caring of them to let you in like that. Nice of them to share. That's something. We can learn. We can find out more, can't we? About race for chase, and dylan's wings of change. I'm wearing the button here. Logon to goodmorningamerica.Com on yahoo! So many ways to become a part of the healing.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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