FDA Trans Fats Ban May Target Your Favorite Food

Find out whether the new rule will change the way you shop for groceries.
3:42 | 11/08/13

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Transcript for FDA Trans Fats Ban May Target Your Favorite Food
Moving on to more on the big announcement from the fda requiring companies to phase out all transfats from our foods. Saying this could save up to 7,000 lives a year. Abc news health and wellness editor, david si cinco has more on this for us. Reporter: With the fda's announcement, you're probably wondering what are transfats doing in our food the first place? It's taste, texture, a longer shelf life. There's a downside. It raises bad cholesterol, lowers the good kind, and leads to 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths a year. California followed by 13 cities across the u.S., Have already banned transfats in restaurants. According to the american heart association, you should aim to have no more than two grams of transfat per day. The transfats are in so many foods we eat and in much higher levels than advised. At carl's jr., The biscuits and gravy has seven grams of transfats. At long john silver's, one taco has a what happening nine grams of transfat. What we should limit ourselves to an entire work week. And it's not just restaurants. Many of the foods in your local grocery store are loaded with transfats. This plea calendar's apple pie has three grams of transfat per serving. Pills bury grands biscuits, another three grams. And pop secret has five grams of transfat her serving. Long john silver's and carl's jr.S are going to eliminate oils that are high in transfats. What happens if food companies are forced to stop using transfats in their products? Will that cookie taste like it does now? When you do that substitution, you don't necessarily come up with the same cookie that your customers want. Reporter: Not such a crummy alternative, when you consider the health benefits. Not the biscuits. What is it about it that makes our food taste so good? It makes frosting smooth and creamy. And it becomes not a puddle of goo. It takes cakes and cookies and helps them brown more easily. Thank you. Tell me what's wrong with it again? It's -- 25% -- it's wrong. It's heart-harming, sam. And also 25% less expensive for food manufacturers and they love that. That's it. You brought a little prop with you because you're saying we should look at the label. And placement on the label is important. These are head fakes. This is a lot of advertising, marketing hype on the box. This quaker guy, he looks trusting. Ignore it. Flip the box over. Look at the label. If it says zero transfat but you find partially hydrogenated soybean oil, that means it has transfat. If it's high on the ingredients list, it means it has more of that. I didn't know that. Heart-healthy. It says it's heart-healthy. As americans, we have become really calorie-conscious. Now, we have to become ingredient conscious. And the good news is, all of your favorite foods, you can still find -- I've been researching them for seven years. There's a good swap for every one of your favorite foods that has zero transfat. Tell us later. And especially the biscuit one. Robin and I are very sad. Egg sandwich, george? Thanks, dave.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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