Japan Tsunami: One Year Later

Bill Weir looks into tragic event that killed nearly 16,000 people.
0:44 | 03/11/12

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Transcript for Japan Tsunami: One Year Later
Thousand times. -- both the missing and dead. And we all remember these images that biblical destruction triggered by that earthquake. Tsunami. And then of course the nuclear panic that followed but what is life like there now. Nightline anchor Bill -- Takes us there. How does an earthquake this strong away. This destructive and in nuclear accident this terrifying changing nationwide and back along the coastline Japan. -- heartbreaking transformation is obvious this was. -- how high the way it went. Right through this department. -- all the way up -- the third story leave the tsunami zone and the changes are harder to see. But just as massive. For one there is the fear of radiation from the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant. Despite the triple meltdown there atomic and health experts from around the world say the most dangerous radiation was contained. You trust what the government knows. It is. -- she says but it's not just the government. Even among nuclear experts have different opinions another indication of the strain the rising number of ghost stories people who see tsunami victims running from the way. People call this ghost town you -- who grew more to a tells me people who can -- the spears the ghosts see them even in the daytime hours but she is a symbol of survival now after this photograph made front pages around the world. She was desperately searching for her little boy -- the shutter -- Took three days. But she found. Now every single day is precious she tells me and -- this. This complete auditorium. Filled with them. -- -- -- -- And that's the one thing that hasn't changed in Japan they're legendary sense of community and mutual respect -- where ABC news Sendai Japan.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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